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Article Title Updated
Outcome of IMO MSC 98 (Maritime Safety Committee)

INTERCARGO's Brief on the outcome of the 98th session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 98) which met between the 7th and 16th June 2017, is attached.

The Brief covers topics that may be of interest to members and includes:

  • Cargoes
  • Common Structural Rules
  • Maritime Security
  • In Water Survey Requirements
  • Low Sulphur Fuel (0.5% Cap)
  • Other – Autonomous ships

Members please login to access.

READ MORE
18 June 2017
Outcome of IMO Facilitation Committee (FAL 41)

Outcome of FAL 41

FAL 41 (the 41st session of the IMO Facilitation Committee) was held on 4 - 7 Apr 2017.

Further to the pre-FAL 41 brief on 28 Mar 2017, here is the outcome of FAL 41 on relevant issues:

1. Tragic loss of bulk carrier Stellar Daisy

FAL 41 was opened on Tue 4 Apr with updates by relevant parities on search and rescue operations for the 22 missing crew and condolences to the families affected by the casualty of the Very Large Ore Carrier Stellar Daisy in the South Atlantic off Uruguay on Fri 31 Mar.

READ MORE
11 June 2017
Outcome of the IMO NCSR 4

The 4th session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR 4) is held on 6-10 Mar 2017. The following items and the progress made at NCSR 4 would be useful for your team covering onboard navigation and communication to refer to.

1. Navigation issues

1.1 Amendments to the existing Long Sand Head two-way route and SUNK Inner precautionary area in the traffic separation scheme "In the SUNK area and in the Northern approaches to the Thames Estuary", were approved and is expected to be adopted by MSC 98 in Jun 2017, as follows:

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10 March 2017
Outcome of SDC 4 (4th session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction), 13-17 Feb 2017

Outcome of SDC 4 (4th session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction), 13-17 Feb 2017

1. General

Large part of SDC 4 this week spent on passenger safety issues which would not be briefed herewith. There are a few aspects at DSC 4 with outcome relevant to bulk carriers, although not specific bulk carrier issues, still requiring members attention, and valuable input and feedback from experiences to guide INTERCARGO to contribute to the following up work of SDC 4, including the work of 2 correspondence groups:

• Application of deadweight-dependent regulations if a deadweight at a trimmed waterline exceeds the even-keel deadweight
• Detailed discussion and continuous work by correspondence group: Revised SOLAS regulation II-1/3-8 and associated guidelines (MSC.1/Circ.1175) and new guidelines for safe mooring operations for all ships
• Detailed discussion in SDC 4/WP.4 and continuous work by correspondence group: Second generation intact stability criteria

READ MORE
11 June 2017
PPR 4 Outcome

23 January 2016

The 4th session of the IMO sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response met at the IMO headquarters in London between 16 and 20 January 2017.


The key topics for members during PPR 4 were:

  • Fuel Oil Availability (Sulphur Cap)
  • Ballast Water Management

Attached below are:

  • The INTERCARGO brief on the meetings outcome
  • Annex 1 – Guidance on methodologies that may used for enumerating viable organisms for Type Approval of BWMS
  • Annex 2 – “Ballast Water Management – How to do it”

 Member login required

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Implementation of 2020 0.5% sulphur cap: industry paper submitted to IMO

28 Dec. 2016:-

Please find attached for your information the industry paper relating to the

implementation of the 0.5% sulphur cap from 2020 for ships fuel oils

agreed and submitted by BIMCO, CLIA, ICS, INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO, IPTA and WSC

to IMO Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (‘PPR 4’ meeting 16-20 Jan. 2017).

The Sub-Committee is invited to consider the points outlined in paragraph 9 (and 10) of the attached, i.e. basically

  1. 1.transitional issues / 2. impact on machinery systems / 3. verification issues and mechanisms / 4. any regulatory amendments or guidelines

regarding the implementation of the sulphur limit, when delivering its outcome to IMO’s next MEPC 71 in July.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
MSC 97 outcome

25 Nov. 2016:-

Dear Members of INTERCARGO,

Upon conclusion of the IMO MSC 97 (Maritime Safety Committee, 21 - 25 November 2016),

the INTERCARGO Secretariat is sending you attached for your immediate information:

  • a brief on the meeting’s outcome
  • paper MSC 97-WP.8 (on Goal Based Standards) cited in the brief.

Should you require more details on any of the above, do not hesitate to contact us at info@intercargo.org.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
MEPC 71 to be held 3-7 July 2017

16 Nov. 2016:-

Dear Members of INTERCARGO,

The next MEPC 71 has been rescheduled for 3-7 July 2017 (from the initially planned 8-12 May dates).

For one thing, this brings any MEPC 71 agreement about ships’ requirement to fit BWMS

further closer  to the BWM Convention Entry into Force date of 8 September 2017.

(refer to our post-MEPC 70 outcome brief).

 

Also the GHG discussions to take place the week before MEPC 71 move accordingly

(refer to our post-MEPC 70 outcome on GHG emissions brief),

and so do the deadlines for submissions to the above meetings.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
MEPC 70 outcome on GHG emissions

04 Nov. 2016:-

Dear Members of INTERCARGO,

Following our last week’s general brief of IMO MEPC 70 outcome (24-28 Oct. 2016 meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee),

the INTERCARGO Secretariat is sending you the present brief specifically on the GHG EMISSIONS outcome for your better understanding of the relevant decisions.

Please find attached 3 documents:

-         -  our brief (3 pages) on GHG EMISSIONS outcome of MEPC 70

-   the full report (9 pages) of the relevant Working Group that was submitted to and approved by MEPC 70 (for a more detailed account of how the above outcome was reached)

-  the INTERCARGO et al. relevant submission to MEPC 70 (MEPC 70/7/8) in favour basically of the 3-step approach and listing the agreed principles of such an approach on page 4

READ MORE
25 February 2017
MEPC 70 outcome

28 Oct. 2016:-

Dear Members of INTERCARGO,

Upon conclusion of the IMO MEPC 70 (24-28 Oct. 2016 meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee),

the INTERCARGO Secretariat is sending you for your immediate information

the attached brief on the meeting’s outcome on:

  • GHG (Green House Gas Emissions from ships)
  • BWM (Ballast Water Management)
  • Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency
    • Consideration of EEDI Reduction Rates and Dates
    • Fuel Oil Availability
    • Data Collection
    • Minimum Power
  • Consideration and Adoption of Amendments to Mandatory Instruments
    • Draft amendments to MARPOL Annex V

Should you require more details on any of the above, do not hesitate to contact us at info@intercargo.org.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
INTERCARGO outcome of IMO CCC 3

The INTERCARGO Secretariat attended the 3rd Session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC 3), between the 5th and 9th September, and then the 26th Session of the Editorial and Technical Group (E&T 26) between the 12th and 16th September.

Among the items that were considered during these two meetings the  following items may be of interest to members (member login required):

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Outcome of LEG 103

The 103rd session of the IMO’s Legal Committee (LEG 103) meeting was held at the IMO Headquarters in London on 8-10 Jun 2016.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Outcome of MSC 96

Between the 11th and 20th May 2016, the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) held their 96th session at the IMO headquarters in London. Here is the summary of the key points that may be of interest for members:

GOAL BASED NEW CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS

Members will be aware that the IMO conducted audits of IACS members in order to verify that the Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers complied with SOLAS Regulation II-1/3-10 Goal-based ship construction standards for bulk carriers and oil tankers.

The findings of the audits were published earlier this year and included 6 Non-Conformities (NCs) and 88 Observations (OBs). IACS (and their members) provided, to the IMO, corrective action plans to address the NCs and OBs.

Although not all of the NCs and OBs have been closed, the MSC at this session, after reviewing the audit reports and corrective actions plans, has confirmed that the IACS Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers are in compliance with SOLAS Goal Based New Construction Standards. This is an important step forward for the construction of bulk carriers as it is the first time that the IMO has a role in verifying Classification Societies Rules.

With regards to the NCs and OBs: As part of agreement that the Rules conform to the IMO GBS requirements IACS must take action ( and it is reported is doing so) on closing out the NCs; the NCs will be corrected and Rule changes identified by July 2016, these proposed Rule changes will be submitted for an industry review in August 2016 followed by the Rules being updated and then issued in January 2017. The revised Rules will then apply from July 2017. It was also agreed in MSC 96, that IACS must report on the status of addressing the OBs in December 2016.

Additional background information for members:

SOLAS Regulation II-1/ 3-10 Goal-based ship construction standards for bulk carriers and oil tankers, states, inter alia :

Ships shall be designed and constructed for a specified design life to be safe and environmentally friendly, when properly operated and maintained under the specified operating and environmental conditions, in intact and specified damage conditions, throughout their life.

Regulation 3-10 entered into force on the 1 July 2012 and applies to bulk carriers over 150m in length and;

1. for which the building contract is placed on or after 1 July 2016;

2. in the absence of a building contract, the keels of which are laid or which are at a similar stage of construction on or after 1 July 2017; or

3. the delivery of which is on or after 1 July 2020

Members should also note that the MSC has confirmed that ships contracted under the current verified rules are deemed to meet the GBS Standards.

CHANGES TO SOLAS

During this session the MSC adopted amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention which include;

CHAPTER II-1 Construction – Structure, subdivision and stability, machinery and electrical installations

Regulation 3-12 Protection against noise, has been amended to close a gap in the application dates of this regulation. This regulation entered into force on 1 July 2014 and stipulated that ships should be constructed to reduce onboard noise in accordance with the Code on noise levels onboard ships. However the wording of the application dates, in the regulation, meant that in some cases vessels do not fall within the regulation.

A draft SOLAS amendment was developed and approved during this session, which will be put forward for adoption at the next MSC with a planned entry in force of January 2020.

CHAPTER III Life-saving appliances and arrangements

Regulation 3 has been amended to include a definition for “ Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair” of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear.

Regulation 20, Operational readiness, maintenance and inspections has been amended to bring in new requirements for Maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats, rescue boats and fast rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear

The above amendments will enter into force on 1 January 2020

The committee also adopted a new MSC Resolution on the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear, which aims to establish a uniform, safe and documented standard for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of the equipment and will be applicable to all ships. The entry into force of this resolution will also be January 2020.

CHANGES TO ESP CODE

Draft amendments to the ESP Code (International Code on the Enhanced Programme of Inspections During Surveys of Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers) were approved will enter into force on 1 January 2018.

The amendments, in addition to being editorial, refer to the IMO the Revised recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships (adopted by resolution A.1050(27)) when providing for safe access for surveyors to enter spaces for inspection.

For those members that are interested, the changes are:

CODE ON THE ENHANCED PROGRAMME OF INSPECTIONS DURING SURVEYS
OF BULK CARRIERS HAVING SINGLE-SIDE SKIN CONSTRUCTION

1 In paragraph 4.2.1.3, the words "hard protective" are inserted after the words "When such breakdown of".

2 Paragraph 5.2.2 is replaced by the following:
"5.2.2 In order to enable the attending surveyors to carry out the survey, provisions for proper and safe access should be agreed between the owner and the Administration, based on recommendations developed by the Organization.” [Refer to the Revised recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.1050(27)]

3 Paragraph 5.2.9 is replaced by the following:
"5.2.9 The surveyor(s) should always be accompanied by at least one responsible person, assigned by the owner, experienced in tank and enclosed spaces inspection."

4 Paragraph 5.2.10 is deleted.

CODE ON THE ENHANCED PROGRAMME OF INSPECTIONS DURING SURVEYS
OF BULK CARRIERS HAVING DOUBLE-SIDE SKIN CONSTRUCTION

5 Paragraph 5.2.2 is replaced by the following:
"5.2.2 In order to enable the attending surveyors to carry out the survey, provisions for proper and safe access should be agreed between the owner and the Administration, based on recommendations developed by the Organization” [Refer to the Revised recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships, adopted by the Organization by resolution A.1050(27)]

6 Paragraph 5.2.9 is replaced by the following:
"5.2.9 The surveyor(s) should always be accompanied by, at least, one responsible person, assigned by the owner, experienced in tank and enclosed spaces inspection."

7 Paragraph 5.2.10 is deleted.

CHANGES TO IMDG CODE

Draft amendments to the draft International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code include changes to; Part 1 General Provisions, Definitions and Training; Part 2 Classification; and Part 4 Packing and Tank Provisions. Further details can be provided on request. These amendments will enter in force on 1 January 2018

MEASURES TO ENHANCE MARITIME SECURITY

During this session, the committee agreed to develop high-level and non-mandatory cyber risk management guidelines which should be practical, easy to use, risk based with a focus on operational issues and should also take into account any existing standards and work done by other organisations. A working group was established to develop the guidelines

The committee after; reviewing the guidelines (which had been developed by the working group), reviewing the working group report and further discussions in Plenary, agreed to a new MSC Circular on Interim Guidelines on maritime risk management.

The next sessions of MSC (MSC 97) and FAL (FAL 41) will provide an opportunity for further work and to be carried out on the Interim Guidelines.

CHANGES TO THE STCW CONVENTION AND CODE

A number of proposed amendments to the STCW Convention ( The International Convention on Standards of Training , Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers) and to the STCW Code were discussed during MSC 96.

The amendments were approved at MSC 96 and will be adopted at MSC 97 and will enter into force in July 2018. The amendments relate to qualifications and training of Masters and Chief Officers of ships operating in polar waters as defined in the Polar Code.

SAFETY LEVELS OF BULK CARRIERS

Members may also be interested to read the attachment to this email (MSC 96-INF.6) which provides some information on bulk carrier casualties and accidents.

If you have any questions regarding the above or would like more information regarding MSC 96, please feel free to contact me.

For additional information, contact info@intercargo.org.


End

READ MORE
25 February 2017
IMO work programs (outputs) and the agendas for next sessions of its Sub-Committees

IMO document "MSC 96-23" contains the biennial status reports of the work programs (outputs) of the following Sub-Committees and the provisional agendas for their next sessions:

Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC)
Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW)
Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III)
Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR)
Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction (SDC)
Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE)

Title of MSC 96-23 is WORK PROGRAMME - Biennial status reports of the CCC, HTW, III, NCSR, SDC and SSE Sub-Committees and provisional agendas for their forthcoming sessions, issued on 22 Mar 2016. The document is enclosed here for download.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Events, Correspondence Groups and Working Groups

13 Apr. 2016:-

IMO document "MSC 96-23" contains the biennial status reports of the work programs (outputs) of the following Sub-Committees and the provisional agendas for their next sessions:

Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC)
Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW)
Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III)
Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR)
Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction (SDC)
Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE)

Title of MSC 96-23 is WORK PROGRAMME - Biennial status reports of the CCC, HTW, III, NCSR, SDC and SSE Sub-Committees and provisional agendas for their forthcoming sessions, issued on 22 Mar 2016. The document is enclosed here for download.

 

Intercargo supports IMO Maritime Day 

Photo: Intercargo Secretary-General Mr David Tongue being received by IMO Secretary-General Mr Koji Sekimizu

IMO has celebrated World Maritime Day on 24 Sept 2015, with the theme “Maritime education and training”, which received wide support from industry including Intercargo.

World Maritime Day is an official United Nations day, celebrated every year, providing an opportunity to focus attention on the importance of shipping safety, maritime security and the marine environment and to emphasize a particular aspect of IMO's work. Individual Governments are encouraged to mark the day, on a date of their choosing but usually in the last week of September.

Each World Maritime Day has its own theme, which is reflected in IMO’s work throughout the year. In 2015, attention has focused on the need for high quality maritime education and training, as the bedrock of a safe and secure shipping industry.

“Without a quality labour force, motivated, trained and skilled to the appropriate international standards, shipping cannot thrive,” IMO Secretary-General Koji Sekimizu said, in his annual World Maritime Day message.

“Not only that, all the many advances that have been made, in terms of safety and environmental impact, are at risk if personnel within the industry are unable to implement them properly,” Mr. Sekimizu said. “The importance of training and education for the maritime personnel of today and tomorrow is greater than ever before.”

Mr. Sekimizu also highlighted the need for greater efforts to be made to bring new generations into seafaring as a profession, noting that seafaring must be seen to appeal to new generations as a rewarding and fulfilling career. “The world depends on a safe, secure and efficient shipping industry; and the shipping industry depends on an adequate supply of seafarers to operate the ships that carry the essential cargoes we all rely on,” Mr. Sekimizu said.

To encourage young people into choosing further education and careers in the maritime world and to raise awareness, IMO’s London Headquarters opened its doors on Tuesday (22 September) and Wednesday (23 September) to more than 300 primary and secondary age school children, from local and international schools based in London, for special World Maritime Day events.  

The young people engaged with seafarer cadets from all over the world and representatives from maritime training institutes and international shipping organizations, who outlined the benefits and attractions of a career at sea and in the broader maritime professions.

IMO has also established the IMO Maritime Ambassador Scheme, to promote the rich and varied career opportunities for young people, both at sea and ashore, in the multi-faceted maritime world. 

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon also issued a message for World Maritime Day,

"Today, shipping is a modern, highly technical, professional discipline that requires a great deal of skill, knowledge and expertise from the maritime workforce. A safe, secure and clean shipping industry can only be built on effective standards of education and training, which is the theme for this year's World Maritime Day,” Mr. Ban said.

 

IMO meetings:

2ndsession of Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR 2)

2ndsession of Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW 2)

2ndSession of sub-committee on ship design and construction (SDC 2)

2ndsession of Sub-committee on navigation, communications and search and rescue (NCSR 2)

2ndsession of Sub-committee on ship systems and equipment (SSE 2)

102ndsession of Legal Committee (LEG 102)

68thsession of Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 68)

95thsession of Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 95)

114thsession of COUNCIL (C 114)

2ndsession of Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III 2)

2ndsession of Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC 2)

 

IMO Correspondence Groups (CG)

CG on Review of Guidelines (G8) (Guidelines for approval of ballast water management systems)

CG on Fuel oil quality

CG on Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches (2nd round discussion to be completed by 22 Oct)

CG on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (at member nomination stage, not start working yet)

CG on Amendments to the IGF Code and guidelines for low-flashpoint fuels

 

Industry Correspondence Groups

GBS-SCF - Cross Industry

Cyber security – development of Industry Guidelines on Cyber Security on board Ships

Joint Working Group (JWG) on Energy Efficiency of Ships (JWG/EEDI, led by IACS )

JWG on Anchoring, Towing and Mooring Requirements

Industry Joint Lifeboat Working Group

Ship Recycling

 

Other events:

Green Awards meetings

Meetings with Malaysian IMO Permanent Representative with International Group (IG)

Meet New Panamanian Ambassador

EUNAVFOR High Level Working Group

Marine Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) meeting in London

Piracy BMP Egyptian Embassy 6 South Street, W1k 1DW

European Shipping Week Conference – Various meetings

ECSA 50th Anniversary Dinner

CMA Stamford + USCG

EPA Washington

Speaker: IMarEST BW Conference

Seatrade Judging

Leadership Forum Piracy

Kuantan – Meeting with new Malaysian Competent Authority and Port Representatives

Korean Register European Committee

EU MRV Expert Group and meetings

Meet AMSA - Bauxite schedule

Golden Anchor Awards/Istanbul

IMO World Maritime Day

27th Equasis Editorial Board Meeting

Tripartite 2015/Seoul

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Correspondence Groups

Intercargo participates in/monitors  the following IMO CGs in 2017:

  1. CG on Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches
  2. CG on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and SEEDCAKE
  3. CG on Safe Mooring Operations

Contact info@intercargo.org for a progress update of the CGs.

READ MORE
19 June 2017
INTERCARGO Submissions

 

 (member login required to see the complete listing)

 

READ MORE
11 June 2017
IMO Correspondence Groups and Joint Industry Working Groups

IMO Correspondence Groups and Joint Industry Working Groups

INTERCARGO joins and participates in the following working groups:

A. Correspondence Groups (CG) at IMO

  1. CG on Review of Guidelines (G8) (Guidelines for approval of ballast water management systems)
  2. CG on Fuel oil quality
  3. CG on Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches (2nd round discussion to be completed by 22 Oct)
  4. CG on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (at member nomination stage, not start working yet)
  5. CG on Amendments to the IGF Code and guidelines for low-flashpoint fuels

B. Industry Correspondence Groups

  1. GBS-SCF - Cross Industry
  2. Cyber security – development of Industry Guidelines on Cyber Security on board Ships
  3. Joint Working Group (JWG) on Energy Efficiency of Ships (JWG/EEDI, led by IACS )
  4. JWG on Anchoring, Towing and Mooring Requirements
  5. Industry Joint Lifeboat Working Group
  6. Ship Recycling

Please contact INTERCARGO office via info@INTERCARGO.org to get the full text of drafts and updates about the progress and outcome of those groups.

An update on activities of those groups on 7 Oct refers to the pdf file.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
IMO Stowaway Focal Point

Despite the best efforts to prevent access in the first place, the discovery of a stowaway can create many problems for Masters and Owners of ships. To assist in the humanitarian and rapid repatriation of stowaways, IMO has agreed to provide on a trial basis, an IMO Stowaway Focal Point (SFP), to assist in cases when P&I and Flag states cannot make progress with the authorities concerned in the landing of the stowaway at the first port of call. Subject to the standing instructions of the company concerned, please ensure that the SFP is made aware of cases as a statistical return, or is asked to provide assistance when the P&I / Flag / Other parties cannot resolve the issue.

Contact details (business hours only) are +44 207 587 3110 or email: falsec@imo.org

Click here for the structured information which will assist in advising the SFP or other parties about the stowaway

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Forthcoming Regulations

Introduction

Following a request from members to receive an impact-assessment timetable of regulatory issues likely to have an impact on Bulk Carriers, the Secretariat has drawn up the following table to give members advance notification of known legislative changes.

As an important caveat, the information shown below is insufficient to give companies a full understanding of what is required from them to implement the requirements of International conventions or other national requirements.  Further advice from Classification Societies – for example to ABS, DNV and LR, to whom we acknowledge our thanks for some of the core information contained below, and your Flag State must be sought prior to making strategic decisions or incurring capital expenditure.

The information is in two parts and is designed (errors and omissions excepted) to reflect requirements for Dry Bulk vessels over 10,000 dwt engaged on international voyages :-  A) Regulations etc which have entered into force in the last 12 months or so; and B) Regulations etc entering into force in the future. Any date in [square brackets] is estimated and may be subject to change.  The requirements are broadly sorted into the Intercargo Work Programme summary headings but are listed in chronological order.

Advice of regulatory activity not mentioned below is welcomed and should be sent to info@INTERCARGO.org

Information updated to : 24 Dec 2012

A) Regulations introduced in immediate past appropriate to Intercargo entered tonnage (chronological)

Short title

Enabling convention

Description

Ship type

E.i.f

Casualties – Emergency Towing Procedures

SOLAS II-1/3-4

Capabilities to tow ship from fore and aft positions

All

1.1.12

Design Standards – Liferafts

Life Saving Appliances (LSA Code)

Capacity for persons 75kg raised to 82.5 kg

All

1.1.12

Design Standards – smoke extraction

SOLAS 11-2

FSS (Fire Safety Systems) Code

Electrical and audible signal charges

All

1.1.12

Port State Control – IAPP

Supplement of IAPP Certificate

To specify the Sulphur content of bunker used by ship as per BDN

All

1.2.12

Air Emissions – EEDI Calculations

MARPOL VI

Reference EEDI Calculation Guidelines establish the reference lines for each ship type to comply with a required EEDI

All

2.3.12

Air Emissions – EEDI Survey & Certification

MARPOL VI

Revisions to the EEDI S & C G/L. Preliminary verification at the design stage which should include model tests for determining the ships power curve.  Development of an EEDI Technical File (details of how the attained EEDI was created) which is then subject to a final verification after sea trials.

All

2.3.12

Environmental – Recycling

Ship Recycling Convention

Guidelines for the Authorization of Ship Recycling Facilities (Competent Authority)

All

2.3.12

Environmental – Recycling

Ship Recycling Convention

Guidelines for the Authorization of Ship Recycling Facilities (Ship Recycling Facility Plan)

All

2.3.12

Reception Facilities – Regional Reception Facilities Plan

MARPOL VI; I, II. IV and V, VI

Guidelines to assist Governments

All

2.3.12

Reception Facilities – SIDS

MARPOL VI; I, II. IV and V

Small Island Developing states can develop regional arrangements in / outside Special Areas.  Must be approved by the Committee

All

2.3.12

Casualties – Pilot ladders

SOLAS V

Pilot ladders.  To be certificated by the manufacturers.  No mechanical pilot hoists

All

1.7.12

Design Standards – Bridge Alarms

SOLAS 1/19.2

Bridge Navigation Watch Alarm Systems (BNWAS) – to be installed and working.  Earlier systems installed to 1.7.11 may be permissible

Cargo

1.7.12

Design Standards – Coatings

SOLAS 11 – 1/3-2

Double Side Skin Bulk Carriers to be coated in accordance with IMO’s approved Coating Performance Standards. Also dedicated seawater ballast tanks

Bulk

1.7.12

Design standards – Fire Safety Systems

FSS (Fire Safety Systems) Code

FSS Code revised : Fixed Fire output systems used as output devices to other FSS e.g. fire dampers

All

1.7.12

Design Standards – Fire Test Procedures (FTP)

FTP

New procedures for testing

All

1.7.12

Environmental – Invasive Species

- USA requirement (Anti Fouling System Convention)

For US flagged ships and others operating in US waters.  This is a certification compliance issue at this stage given that the AFS Convention entered into force on 17.9.08 (with all coatings made applicable 60 months – i.e. 17.9.13, after this date)

All

21.11.12

Navigation – AIS

SOLAS V

AIS annual testing to verify correct programming of ships I.D

All

1.7.12

Navigation – EGC

SOLAS IV / 7

Enhanced Group Call (ECG) to be type approved by INMARSAT

Cargo

1.7.12

Port State Control – SOLAS I certs

SOLAS 1

Certificate revision when alternative design and arrangements for machinery and electrical installations / fire protection / LSA applied

All

1.7.12

Air Emissions – US ECA

Chapter IV

ECA to USA / Canada : 1.8.12 = 1.0% S in fuel; 1.1.15 = 0.1%.  Steamships built on / before 1.8.11 not designed to use distillates exempted until 1.1.20.  For 200nm transit, its 1%.  SoX scrubbers OK provided meets equivalence

All

1.8.12

 

B) Regulations for introduction in future appropriate to Intercargo entered tonnage (chronological)

 

Short title

Enabling convention

Description

Ship type

E.i.f

Air Emissions – EEDI

MARPOL VI

Attained EEDI is not to exceed a maximum.  Chapter IV – Reg 21 ?.  International Energy Efficiency Certificate introduced.

B/C & OBO

1.1.13

Air Emissions – SEEMP

MARPOL VI / Ch IV

SEEMP to be provided and kept on board.  Ships Energy Efficiency Management Plan

All

1.1.13

Cargoes – IMSBC

IMSBC

Revisions.  New schedules. Shippers to declare whether “Harmful to the Marine Environment” (HME), Exemptions for Special Areas generally withdrawn.  See further guidance under “Reception Facilities” on Intercargo website

All

1.1.13

Design Standards – Lifeboats

MSC 81(70)

New tests for lifeboats and equipment installed – for ships with keel laid after this date 1.1.13

All

1.1.13

Reception Facilities – Garbage Management Plans

MARPOL V

Guidelines and revisions : discharge of cargo hold cleaning agents HME in HWW prohibited

All

1.1.13

Navigation – ECDIS

SOLAS 1 / 19.2

ECDIS to be fitted unless scrapping within 2 years.  Also, Bride Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS) required and operational when underway.

Cargo

1.7.13 (where keel laid : but age / size dependent)

Navigation – Ship Reporting Great Belt

SOLAS V / II

Mandatory reporting for ships with an air draft greater that 15m in / to ports in BELTREP (Danish Great Belt)

All

1.7.13

Air Emissions – SCR

MARPOL VI – NoX Code

Scheme B for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) engines which cannot be pre-certificated on a test bed

All

1.8.13

Reception Facility

MARPOL V (see MEPC 219/63)

No discharging of cargo hold cleaning agents deemed HME in HWW; no discharge of incinerator ash (previously allowed 12nm outside Non Special Areas)

All

1.8.13

Reception Facilities – Regional plans

MARPOL 1; IV; V

Reception facilities permissible through “Regional Reception Facilities Plan” for Small Island Developing States

All

1.8.13

Training, Manpower & Human Element

Maritime Labour Convention

Enters into force

All

20.8.13

Environmental – Invasive Species

Anti Fouling System Convention

Final date for non-compliant coatings, noting the Convention entered into force on 17.9.08.  Most owners will have complied some time in advance of this date.

All

17.9.13

Air Emissions – Puerto Rico ECA : aka US Caribbean Sea

MARPOL VI (see MEPC.1/Circ 755)

ECA enters into force : 1.1.14 = 1.0% S in fuel; 1.1.15 = 0.1%.  Ships not designed to use distillates exempted until 1.1.20.

All

1.1.14

(some exemption to 1.1.20)

Casualties

Loadline Annex B / Annex II . Reg 47

New definition of the northern boundary of the Southern Winter Seasonal Zone

All

1.1.14 (expected)

Design standards – ESP

SOLAS XI-I

Enhanced Survey Programme – IMO 744 replaced by new International Code on Enhanced Programme of Inspections (A.1049 (27)

Bulk

1.1.14

Design standards – Fire Safety Systems

FSS (Fire Safety Systems) Code

FSS Code revised for fixed fire systems

All

1.1.14

Design standards – Lifeboat testing

SOLAS III / 20

Free Fall Life Boats (FFLB). Simulated tests OK during annual and 5 year overload (added to already OK 3m abandon ship drills)

All

1.1.14

Design standards – Speed Logs

SOLAS V / 19

Two separate devices for speed through the water and speed over the ground required

All

1.1.14

Navigation – VDRs

SOLAS V

Voyage Data Recorder standards amended – fixed recording medium and float free recording medium

All

1.1.14

Operational – Load Lines

ICLL 68/88

Coordinated dates of Southern Winter Seasonal Zone amendments (Load Line)

All

1.1.14

Piracy – Reporting

SOLAS V – LRIT Data

Distribution facilities for LRIT enhanced in Gulf of Aden / Wider Indian Ocean enhanced to include polling functionalities to more accurately identify ships in HRA

All

1.1.14

Casualties – Self Contained Breathing Apparatus

SOLAS – see MSC 338 (91)

All Ships must be able to re-charge SCBAs on board when discharged in drills etc. Or have the capability of replacing used cylinders on board

All

1.7.14

Design standards – on load release hooks

SOLAS III / 1.5

Non compliant on-load release hooks to be replaced by complaint products (see : MSC.1/Circ 1392)

All

1.7.14 – first Dry Dock after then; latest 1.7.19

Environmental – noise

SOLAS – see MSC 337 (91)

MSC 91 agreed on-board noise limits its circular MSC 337 (91).  These will apply to new-buildings where the contract has been placed on/after 1 July 2014 or for delivery on/after 1 July 2018.

All

1.7.14

Navigation – CAM Alarms

SOLAS V – Bridge Equipment

GMDSS amendments including Central Alert Management (CAM) systems to meet standards

All

1.7.14

Design Standards – Single Side Skin

SOLAS 11-1

Single Side Skin designed and built to Class Rules which are GBS compliant verified by IMO to meet GBS in B/C >150m

B/C

1.7.16 (starts)

Design Standards – Design Life

SOLAS 11-1

GBS Compliance Design Life of 25 years North Atlantic rules in B/C >150m

B/C

1.7.16

Environment – NoX Code

NoX Code

Tier III standard – for ships in ECA

All

1.7.16

Casualties – Self Contained Breathing Apparatus

SOLAS – see MSC 338(91)

SCBA must have a capacity of at least 1,200 litres. Ships constructed on/before 1.1.02 need not phase out existing apparatus.

All

1.7.19

Environment – CFCs

MARPOL VI / 12

Use of CFCs

All

1.1.20

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25 February 2017

Air Emissions

Article Title Updated
The Sulphur Cap question post 2020

Following our recently organised seminar and survey,

another interesting study discusses the relevant main options:

  • Low sulphur fuels (max 0.5%)
  • Scrubbers
  • Alternative Fuels (LNG, Methanol)

Members please login to read more.

READ MORE
09 June 2017
“Future Fuels – the 2020 challenge” presentation and survey

lNTERCARGO hosted a presentation session delivered by Lloyd’s Register at our London office on 24 May (see details and presentation here).

Also Members please login to see the results of our Indicative Survey among the seminar attendees (about 25 representatives of Full & Associate member companies) on below questions:

Question 1: In 2020, will the availability of max 0.5% Sulphur fuels be enough to meet the shipping industry needs?

Question 2: Best solution for existing dry bulkers in view of 2020:

Question 3: Best solution for Newbuilding dry bulkers in view of 2020:

Question 4: Will scrubbers be a cost competitive option against the use of max 0.5% Sulphur fuels?

Question 5: By 2020, will manufacturers/shipyards have enough capacity to meet scrubber installation needs?

READ MORE
01 June 2017
GHG submissions to IMO MEPC 71 and Intersessional meeting

INTERCARGO and its Round Table partners have submitted the attached two papers:

  • "Elements for inclusion in the IMO strategy including "Aspirational Objectives" " for consideration at the IMO Intersessional meeting of the Working Group on Reduction of GHG emissions from ships (26-30 June 2017).

The co-sponsors wish to share some ideas on the elements for inclusion in the IMO strategy for CO2 reduction, and the initial strategy to be adopted in 2018, including some ambitious "Aspirational Objectives" that the Organization might consider on behalf of international shipping. The co-sponsors emphasize that any objectives agreed should be non-binding in character and must not imply any kind of commitment or intention to place a binding cap on the sector's total CO2 emissions, or on the CO2 emissions of individual ships.

  • "REDUCTION OF GHG EMISSIONS FROM SHIPS: Elements for inclusion in the IMO Strategy" for consideration at IMO MEPC 71 (3-7 July 2017).

The co-sponsors comment on document MEPC 71/7/8 and inform about their own submission to ISWG-GHG 1 that includes some "Aspirational Objectives" that the Organization might consider on behalf of international shipping, but which should be non-binding in character and must not imply any kind of commitment or intention to place a binding cap on the sector's total CO2 emissions, or on the CO2 emissions of individual ships.

READ MORE
11 June 2017
WEBINAR on EU-MRV on 9 May 2017

Follow this link for details.

READ MORE
04 May 2017
EU MRV and IMO data collection system presentation

The first 2017 session of lNTERCARGO lunchtime presentations successfully took place at our London office on 17 Feb. Many thanks to our Associate Member DNV GL for delivering two presentations, one of which on the topic of:

• "Closing the gap and be ready for EU MRV and IMO data collection system“

For more details follow the link here.

READ MORE
19 February 2017
Be ready for EU MRV and IMO data collection system

See about upcoming presentation

"Closing the gap and be ready for EU MRV and IMO  data collection system“

on 17 Feb. 2017 at our London office here.

READ MORE
06 February 2017
meetings in January 2017

January 2017:

The INTERCARGO Secretary General participated on behalf of our Association to the following industry meetings in January 2017:

-    Working Group meeting and Round Table meeting with industry partners on Green House Gas emissions

Relevant outcomes and developments will be discussed in our upcoming meetings in Hong Kong.

READ MORE
19 February 2017
January industry meetings

30 Jan 2017:-

INTERCARGO participated to important industry meetings in the month of January 2017.

See relevant Association News article here.

 

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper Issue: GHG Emissions

UNFCCC has the objective of drafting text for a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol. GHG emissions from International shipping have so far been explicitly excluded from the scope of international regulation of GHG under UNFCCC (under the Kyoto Protocol) but with an understanding that IMO would produce appropriate regulation for shipping.
The IMO has adopted operational and technical measures for ships according to its principle of global regulation for a global industry as well as ensuring ‘No More Favourable Treatment’ of ships flying the flag of States that are not parties to MARPOL Annex VI, where these regulations are placed.

READ MORE
19 February 2017
IΜΟ has our full support in the mitigation of global GHG emissions from ships

INTERCARGO Media Release – 12 January 2017

See Media Release here.

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper on MARPOL Annex VI

Why is it an issue: Change of sulphur limits January 2015

 

Compliance can be assured by using ultralow sulphur fuel, by the use of EGCS (exhaust gas cleaning systems) or an alternative fuel such as LNG. There will be an increased demand for 0.10% sulphur content distillate (MGO), and the use of EGCS by ships operating predominantly in ECAs is likely to increase depending on reliability and efficiency.

READ MORE
19 February 2017
Implementation of 2020 0.5% sulphur cap: industry paper submitted to IMO

28 Dec. 2016:-


See IMO section article.

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Air Pollution Control Regulation in Hong Kong and Mainland China

Ref: IC1553, 16 Dec 2015

To: All INTERCARGO Members

Dear Members,

1. Mainland, China
From 2 Dec (this Month), members may have noted reports from Class, P&I and news channel about the introduction of three 0.5% sulphur emission control areas in Mainland China. The full text of the implementation plan as reported could be downloaded from http://www.gov.cn/xinwen/2015-12/04/content_5019932.htm but at present it is only in Chinese. Basically, it says:

READ MORE
19 February 2017
MEPC 71 to be held 3-7 July 2017

16 Nov. 2016:-

The next MEPC 71 has been rescheduled for 3-7 July 2017 (from the initially planned 8-12 May dates).

The GHG discussions to take place the week before MEPC 71 move accordingly.

See IMO section article.

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Air emission and energy efficiency

Air emission and energy efficiency

1. Energy efficiency – IMO MRV

IMO’s ECA requirements entered into force, requesting ships to use on board fuel oil with a sulphur content of no more than 0.10% from 1 January 2015, against the limit of 1.00% in effect up until 31 December 2014.

1.1 The ECAs under MARPOL Annex VI for SOx are:

  • Baltic Sea area – as defined in Annex I of MARPOL (SOx only);
  • North Sea area – as defined in Annex V of MARPOL (SOx only);
  • North American area (entered into effect 1 August 2012) – as defined in Appendix VII of Annex VI of MARPOL (SOx, NOx and PM); and
  • United States Caribbean Sea area (entered into effect 1 January 2014) – as defined in Appendix VII of Annex VI of MARPOL (SOx, NOx and PM).

Outside ECAs, the current limit for sulphur content of fuel oil is 3.50%, falling to 0.50% m/m on and after 1 January 2020. The 2020 date is subject to a review, to be completed by 2018, as to the availability of the required fuel oil. Depending on the outcome of the review, this date could be deferred to 1 January 2025.

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19 February 2017
MEPC 70 outcome on GHG emissions

04 Nov. 2016:-

Following our last week’s general brief of IMO MEPC 70 outcome (24-28 Oct. 2016 meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee),

the INTERCARGO Secretariat is sending you the present brief specifically on the GHG EMISSIONS outcome for your better understanding of the relevant decisions.

See relevant IMO section article.

READ MORE
30 January 2017
MEPC 70 outcome

28 Oct. 2016:-

Upon conclusion of the IMO MEPC 70 (24-28 Oct. 2016 meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee),

the INTERCARGO Secretariat is sending you for your immediate information a brief on the meeting’s outcome on among other:

  • GHG (Green House Gas Emissions from ships)
  • Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency
    • Consideration of EEDI Reduction Rates and Dates
    • Fuel Oil Availability
    • Data Collection
    • Minimum Power

See IMO section article here.

READ MORE
31 January 2017
Industry United in Seeking Further Progress on CO2

19 Oct 2016:-

In advance of next week’s critical meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 70) at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London, the global shipping industry has called on IMO Member States to give serious consideration to a joint industry submission regarding the need for further progress on addressing the sector’s CO2 emissions.

See Media Release here.

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Air Emissions Briefing

The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) met for its 68th session from 11 to 15 May 2015. Its outcome on Air Emissions is summarized as follows, together with the summary of IMO MRV and EU MRV (monitoring, reporting and verification of emission).

READ MORE
30 January 2017
Air Emissions - Latest Developments

17 Feb 2016:-

INTERCARGO, together with BIMCO and ICS, submitted a paper to request IMO's Marine Environment Committee to finalise the global CO2 data collection system at its 69th session (to be held on 18-22 Apr 2016), and to approve amendments to MARPOL Annex VI for its mandatory application, so that ships can provide the required data as soon as possible. The Co-sponsors also reaffirm their continuing support for the ‘three step process’.

The INTERCARGO et al paper can be downloaded by click here.

 

(25 Jan 2016)

Follow-up update (1) - Air Pollution Control Regulation in Hong Kong and Mainland China

As posted further down this webpage on on 16 Dec 2015 , the Air Pollution Control Regulation in China will be implemented from 1 Apr 2016 in Yangtze River core ports - Shanghai, Zhoushan-Ningbo, Suzhou and Nantong ports, referring to the notice of the Ministry of Transport at webpage on 20 Jan 2016:
http://www.mot.gov.cn/buzhangwangye/hejianzhong/zhongyaohuodonghejianghua/201601/t20160120_1978703.html (in Chinese only).

 

READ MORE
30 January 2017

Cargoes

Article Title Updated
Dry cargo claims study by the Standard P&I Club

INTERCARGO members and guests had the opportunity to attend a very interesting presentation by the Standard P&I Club delivered by Yves Vandenborn, Director of Loss Prevention, and Akshat Arora, Marine Surveyor.

The presentation was delivered in the context of the INTERCARGO meetings in Hong Kong on 6-7 March 2017 (see relevant article here) during the Presentations afternoon session on the second day.
Members please login to access the full presentation attached.

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10 March 2017
Indonesia Bauxite and Nickel Ore Ban

Following recent press reports concerning the lifting of the Indonesian Nickel Ore and Bauxite export ban, the INTERCARGO Secretariat issued the following circular to Members:

Quote....

ATTN: ALL MEMBERS – INFORMATION ONLY

Dear Members,

Many of you may have noted the article in Tradewinds “Indonesia eases bauxite and nickel export ban” dated 16th January 2017 which stated that the Indonesian Government is to allow the resumption of exports of  Bauxite and Nickel Ore under certain conditions.

However, we have heard from other sources that the lifting of the export ban is not yet certain and will be subject to ongoing discussions between the various Indonesian Government Departments and other interests.

We would urge Members exercise extreme caution should Indonesian ore exports re-enter the market; as the ban has been in place for some time it is most likely that many stockpiles will be subject to saturation and therefore the possibility of being offered cargoes with an unduly high moisture content may be anticipated. Furthermore,  it is important to note that it has been reported specified shippers   will be permitted to export washed bauxite, this form of processing of cargo was associated with a number of problems in the past and any such cargoes should  carefully  assessed prior to acceptance.

The INTERCARGO Secretariat is following the developments closely and will provide further information when and if available.

...Unquote

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25 February 2017
IMSBC Code Amendments EIF 01 January 2017

Amendment 03-15 of the IMSBC Code will Enter into Force on 01 January 2017, the INTERCARGO Secretariat has produced a document that summarises the new amendments, the document can be downloaded here (member login required)

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25 February 2017
Ammonium Nitrate

21 Nov. 2016:-

The AMSA webpage https://www.amsa.gov.au/forms-and-publications/Fact-Sheets/AMSA279.pdf has information to remind all ship owners, ship operators and masters of the requirements for the safe carriage of Ammonium Nitrate on board ships.

Fertilizers Europe published its issue 2014 - Guidance for sea transport of ammonium nitrate based fertilizers at
http://fertilizerseurope.com/fileadmin/user_upload/publications/tecnical_publications/guidence_techn_documentation/Guidance_for_sea_transport_of_ammonium_nitrate_based_fertilizers_01.pdf.

IMO is now working this aspect but no conclusion has been made yet:
• At the last IMO Subcommittee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC) held in Sept 2016, relevant progress refers to the enclosed “progress at IMO on Ammonium Nitrate Based Fertilizer”. Basically the substance was that Germany proposed to classify AMMONIUM NITRATE BASED FERTILIZER (non-hazardous) as a MHB (OH) Group B cargo.
• The views at IMO CCC (CCC 3 WP.1) and the E&T (E&T 26 WP.1) meetings in Sept 2016 were divided on whether there is enough justification at this time to reclassify the existing schedule for AMMONIUM NITRATE BASED FERTILIZER (non-hazardous) from a Group C to a MHB (OH) Group B cargo. As outcome of the meetings, the industry is urged to provide more data and information on AMMONIUM NITRATE BASED FERTILIZER (non-hazardous), in particular on the different types of fertilizer and their specific properties that are being shipped under this schedule and on the necessity of the existing requirements for these different types of fertilizer.
• This matter will be considered and discussed at the IMO CCC4 on 11-15 Sept 2017.

Comments to info@intercargo.org are invited and appreciated.

READ MORE
25 February 2017
Philippines Cargo Concerns - Developments

02 Nov. 2016:-

Members have expressed at various times concerns relating to the correct description, condition and handling of some Philippines bulk cargoes,  especially potential group ‘A’ cargoes emanating from various southern Filipino ports.

In June, INTERCARGO together with the International Group of P&I Clubs (IG) met with the Filipino IMO representatives to express concern for the correct implementation of the mandatory International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code in the Philippines.  Following discussions with the Philippines IMO Representative a joint IG/INTERCARGO letter (attached) was drafted and forwarded to the relevant authorities in July.

The letter resulted in a September meeting held in Manila between representatives from the Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA), the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) and the Philippines Port Authority (PPA) to formulate action steps in order to begin to find ways to better address the growing concerns.  This meeting agreed that MARINA (as Flag State), PCG (as Port and Coastal State) and PPA (for port facilities) are the competent authorities to implement the IMSBC Code. 

The contact details of the heads of these agencies are as follows:

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25 February 2017
Carrying Solid Bulk Cargoes Safely - Booklet

 INTERCARGO has been working with Lloyd’s Register and the UK P&I Club on a new edition of   “Carrying Solid Bulk Cargoes Safely –  Guidance for crews on the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code”.

The Guidance is aimed to help crews understand the main requirements of the IMSBC Code and to help manage the risks associated with the carriage of Solid Bulk Cargoes.

The new edition of the guidance includes updates on the carriage of Bauxite and also a new section on Cargo residues deemed harmful to the marine environment.

A  limited number of hardcopies are available , please contact the Secretariat  if you wish to place an order.

PDF versions are available for download by clicking here (member login required)

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO outcome of IMO CCC 3

The INTERCARGO Secretariat attended the 3rd Session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC 3), between the 5th and 9th September, and then the 26th Session of the Editorial and Technical Group (E&T 26) between the 12th and 16th September.

Among the items that were considered during these two meetings the  following items may be of interest to members:

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25 February 2017
Bauxite

16 Jun 2016:-

The need for continued vigilance and awareness of the potential cargo risks that may be involved when carrying solid bulk cargoes was again highlighted by the sinking of the bulk carrier “Bulk Jupiter” on 2 Jan 2015, with the tragic loss of 18 of her 19 crew members. The Bahamian flag State investigation has determined liquefaction of the Bauxite cargo as the most probable cause of this unfortunate casualty, with both the inclusion of a higher quantity of fine materials in the cargo to that described in the IMSBC Code schedule, together with a higher moisture content, due to the exceptionally high rainfall experienced prior to shipping, as the most likely contributory factors. Addressing those safety concerns, IMO issued a circular CCC.1/Circ.2 in October 2015 calling for increased scrutiny for the potential dangers of Bauxite cargoes prior to shipping.

You may have downloaded the INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty Report (click here to download). As highlighted in the Casualty Report, liquefaction has been a serious concern of bulk carrier industry.

An article (click here to download) of the publication "Dry Cargo International" (DCI) in its Issue No. 189 March 2016, quoted the comments and concerns of INTERCARGO on cargo safety especially liquefaction. The comments advised an IMO Sub-Committee (Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers or short name “CCC”) to evaluate the properties of bauxite. This evaluation was carried out by an IMO Correspondence Group. INTERCARGO has been part of the IMO evaluation process and is able to update members on bauxite issues as follows:

1) On 13 Jun 2916, IMO made a report “CCC 3-5-1 - Report of the Correspondence Group on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (Japan)” available on its website (restricted access only by Member States and NGOs), reporting progress on:
• Consideration of the marine safety investigation report on the loss of the bulk carrier Bulk Jupiter;
• Preparation of a draft new individual schedule for Bauxite as Group A cargo and review the existing Bauxite schedule, as necessary.

2) Australian, Brazilian and Chinese Bauxite research groups had established a Global Bauxite Working Group (GBWG) and planned to provide a global industry peer review report for CCC 4 (the 4th session of CCC, likely around Sept 2017). Those industry groups have been discussing their respective research programs. It seems to be clear that the characteristics of Bauxite vary depending on the location of mining. The group has already been informed and noted of the varying particle size distribution of Bauxite exported from Australia, Brazil and China for example.

3) IMO Correspondence Group decided to adjourn the consideration on Bauxite and recommended the CCC Sub-Committee to wait for the results of the research by the GBWG, which will be provided to CCC 4 for further consideration.

4) INTERCARGO expressed its view on the postponement of the process: “we are somewhat disappointed that an extension to the Bauxite Study has become necessary as we believe it is of paramount important to ensure the schedules in the Code reflect the actual risks of carriage, especially, following the Bulk Jupiter tragedy. However, we fully understand that achieving consensus often takes longer than anticipated and so we support the proposal by the coordinator on the way forward”. Those comments has been included in the report “CCC 3-5-1” (para 8.1 on page 4)

The report “CCC 3-5-1 - Report of the Correspondence Group on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (Japan)” will be provided for internal reference upon request.

Comments and views:

Comments and views on liquefaction and other cargo safety issues from Members are welcome and appreciated

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25 February 2017
Deck Cargo on Bulk Carriers

Regarding the carriage of cargo on deck and hatch covers of traditional bulk carriers, DNV GL issued a technical guide DECK CARGO ON BULK CARRIERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW in April 2016 with information relevant for design offices, shipyards and owners/managers of bulk carrier.

Click here to download the technical guide DECK CARGO ON BULK CARRIERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

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25 February 2017
Analysis of bulk cargo related incidents

A national awareness workshop on the implementation of the international maritime solid bulk cargoes (IMSBC) code was co-organised by IMO in Malaysia on 25-28 April, with special reference to cargoes that may liquefy – which can be a serious problem.

In addition to local experts, experts from Australia, INTERCARGO, P&I Clubs and Bureau Veritas, among others, took part in the workshop.

The workshop, with special focus on cargoes that may liquefy (Bauxite), provided an overview of the Malaysian experience with bauxite shipments from local ports. Action taken by Malaysia’s Maritime Administration to improve both crew and cargo safety was presented, with positive and constructive feedback provided on national legislation in place to deal with carrying bauxite by sea. Participants also witnessed field sampling and laboratory testing practices.

As a key supporting organisation, INTERCARGO (Mr David Tongue) participated and gave a detailed presentation on bulk cargo related incidents and possible causes. The presentation can be downloaded here.

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25 February 2017
IMO circular on Carriage of Bauxite that may Liquefy

The IMO circular CCC.1/Circ.2 on Carriage of Bauxite that may Liquefy was issued on 20 Oct 2015.


This urges ship Masters not to accept bauxite for carriage unless:
• the moisture limit for the cargo to be loaded is certified as less than the indicative moisture limit of 10% and the particle size distribution is as detailed in the individual schedule for bauxite in the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code; or
• the cargo is declared as Group A (cargoes that may liquefy) and the shipper declares the transportable moisture limit (TML) and moisture content; or
• the Master is presented with an assessment that the cargo does not present Group A properties.
This advice follows findings from the Bulk Jupiter accident investigation, which have triggered the re-assessment of the cargo. The conclusions of this re-assessment will be included in future amendments to the IMSBC Code. Currently, bauxite is assessed as a Group C cargo (cargoes not liable to liquefaction) under the Code.

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25 February 2017
Guidance on carrying solid bulk cargoes safely, by LR, UK P&I and INTERCARGO

Lloyd's Register, the UK P&I Club, and Intercargo have produced a pocket guide for ships' officers and agents who arrange cargoes for loading. The pocket guide and flowchart are the updated version issued in March 2016. The previous version of this joint work by LR, UK P&I and INTERCARGO was issued in 2013.

The pocket guide and flowchart provide guidance on carrying solid bulk cargoes safely.

The pocket guide outlines the precautions to be taken before accepting solid bulk cargoes for shipment; sets out procedures for safe loading and carriage; details the primary hazards associated with different types of cargo; and underlines the importance of proper cargo declarations. A quick reference checklist and flowchart summarise the steps to be followed.

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25 February 2017
Contact names and addresses of national competent authorities relating to the carriage of grain and solid bulk cargoes

IMO circular BC.1/Circ.73, dated 26 Oct 2015, contains a revised list of contact names and addresses of the offices of designated national competent authorities of Member States' Administrations responsible for matters relating to the carriage of grain and solid bulk cargoes.

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25 February 2017
Safe transport of dry bulk cargoes

21 Nov 2016:-
Recently the INTERCARGO Secretariat has been approached frequently by members for information about safe shipment of some dry bulk cargoes, not listed in the IMSBC Code. Due to difficult market condition, more and more members may choose to consider “unfamiliar” cargoes for their fleet to carry. It means that they do not have sufficient experiences in transporting those cargoes and/or they could not find any Schedule within the mandatory IMSBC Code (IMO’s Solid Bulk Cargoes Code). They require for guidance and information to deal with any safety uncertainty.

For a cargo not listed in the IMSBC Code, general suggestion is to: contact with INTERCARGO in case we have something relevant; check the IMSBC Code to see if there is a similar Schedule with the safety information to refer to; refer to section 1.3 of the Code as enclosed and ask for details from the cargo source they are dealing with; and seek additional input and advice from their P&I Club.

For details about assessment of acceptability of dry bulk cargo for safe shipment, the enclosed Section 4 of the Code would guide you through.

Actions requested: feedback on experiences to info@intercargo.rg is encouraged, in order for INTERCARGO to expand its database with cargoes not listed in the IMSBC Code and provide guidance to members when needed and assist IMO in drafting relevant requirements.

7 Oct. 2015: -

INTERCARGO is deeply concerned with recent bulk carrier casualties and strongly promoting safe transport of dry bulk cargoes. Its Technical Committee is doing studies and looking into following elements aiming at removal of possible weak links on the safety chain, which may be the last defense to prevent cargo liquefaction:

  • Documentation of property of cargoes
  • Cargo condition - particle size distribution and level of moisture content
  • Compliance with mandatory requirements of IMSBC Code
  • Shipper’s declaration and approval of competent authority
  • Process of cargo inspection, sampling and testing

For more information and measures, please download the pdf file.

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25 February 2017
Cargoes Briefing

IMO warns on bauxite liquefaction dangers

Ship Masters warned of conditions under which bauxite should be accepted for carriage.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has taken action to warn ship Masters of the possible dangers of liquefaction associated with carriage of bauxite, following consideration of findings from the investigation into the loss of the 10-year-old Bahamas flag bulk carrier Bulk Jupiter, which was carrying 46,400 tonnes of bauxite when it sank rapidly with 18 fatalities in January 2015.

A circular "CCC.1-Circ.2" approved by IMO’s Sub-Committee on Carriage of Containers and Cargoes (CCC2), meeting September 2015 at IMO Headquarters, warns ship Masters of the potential dangers that may be associated with bauxite cargoes and provides considerations to be taken into account to ensure safe carriage.

 

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25 February 2017
Review of IIMA Proposal for a DRI 'D' Schedule

Members will recall that the International Iron Metallics Association (IIMA) has been contracted by Venezuelan interests  to present a case for r the carriage of DRI Fines under ventilation, rather than under an inert atmosphere as currently required by the IMSBC Code.  The proposal is to incorporate to the IMSBC Code a new schedule entitled ‘DRI D’.

This proposal has raised interest and potential concern due to the inherent dangers that have been associated with DRI cargoes; consequently it was determined that peer review of this proposal would be beneficial and the IG has led a joint industry co-operation and Alan Mitcheson of Burgoynes was engaged to undertake a review of the IIMA proposal.  INTERCARGO has contributed financially to facilitate this review.

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25 February 2017
Cargoes - Latest Developments

16 June 2016: -

The INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty Report, available for download from INTERCARGO website http://www.intercargo.org/en/component/attachments/download/176.html, which was submitted to IMO's III 3 in May 2016 for attention, highlights that liquefaction has been a serious concern of bulk carrier industry.

An article of the publication Dry Cargo International (DCI) in its Issue No. 189 March 2016, quotes the comments and concerns of INTERCARGO (click here to download the article). The comments advised that an IMO Sub-Committee (Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers or short name “CCC”) was to evaluate the properties of bauxite. This evaluation was carried out by an IMO Correspondence Group. INTERCARGO has been part of the IMO evaluation process and is able to update members on bauxite issues as follows:

1) On 13 Jun 2016, IMO made a report “CCC 3-5-1 - Report of the Correspondence Group on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (Japan)” available on its website (restricted access only by Member States and NGOs), reporting progress on:
• Consideration of the marine safety investigation report on the loss of the bulk carrier Bulk Jupiter;
• Preparation of a draft new individual schedule for Bauxite as Group A cargo and review the existing Bauxite schedule, as necessary.

2) Australian, Brazilian and Chinese Bauxite research groups had established a Global Bauxite Working Group (GBWG) and planned to provide a global industry peer review report for CCC 4 (the 4th session of CCC, likely around Sept 2017). Those industry groups have been discussing their respective research programs. It seems to be clear that the characteristics of Bauxite vary depending on the location of mining. The group has already been informed and noted of the varying particle size distribution of Bauxite exported from Australia, Brazil and China for example.

3) IMO Correspondence Group decided to adjourn the consideration on Bauxite and recommended the CCC Sub-Committee to wait for the results of the research by the GBWG, which will be provided to CCC 4 for further consideration.

4) INTERCARGO expressed its view on the postponement of the process: “we are somewhat disappointed that an extension to the Bauxite Study has become necessary as we believe it is of paramount important to ensure the schedules in the Code reflect the actual risks of carriage, especially, following the Bulk Jupiter tragedy. However, we fully understand that achieving consensus often takes longer than anticipated and so we support the proposal by the coordinator on the way forward”. Those comments has been included in the report “CCC 3-5-1” (para 8.1 on page 4)

The report “CCC 3-5-1 - Report of the Correspondence Group on Evaluation of Properties of BAUXITE and COAL (Japan)” will be provided for internal reference upon request via info@intercargo.org.

****

 

The IMO Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes And Containers (CCC 2) held its 2nd session on 14-18 Sept 2015. Safe transport of bauxite cargo, a specific bulk carrier issue was on its agenda item 5. It follows up to the loss of lives of 18 seafarers during the rapid sinking in open water of M/V Bulk Jupiter carrying 46,400 tonnes of bauxite on 2 Jan 2015 and discusses actions to be taken for safety transport of bauxite cargo.

A. Introduction of relevant submissions to CCC 2 on safe transport of dry bulk cargoes:

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25 February 2017
Cargoes - Member Consultation

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25 February 2017
No distraction from Liquefaction - NK publication

The NK's Liquefaction project aims to provide a better understanding of cargo liquefaction, and develop recommendations for ship operations and design that avert or mitigate future casualties.

The project looks at the liquefaction problem in a holistic approach considering cargo properties, sea conditions and ship design and addresses both operational and design vessel perspectives. This approach is based on extensive experience/research exampled as laboratory tests and numerical simulations to identify the ship motions and accelerations of the vessel and to predict the behaviour of cargoes which may liquefy - “Group A” in the IMSBC code - in an effort to gain more insight into the liquefaction phenomenon. While research is still ongoing, the results of this project are expected to be employed in the dynamic stability assessment of bulk carriers and general cargo ships under sea conditions similar to those recorded in past incidents.

Refer to the enclosed publication, June 2015 - 72nd Edition, with appreciations to ClassNK.

 

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25 February 2017
IMO Circular on Carriage of Bauxite

All will remember the tragic circumstances of the ‘Bulk Jupiter’ lost with 18 crew whilst carrying a cargo of Bauxite in the opening days of this year.  From the Bahamas investigation report that determined cargo liquefaction as the most probable cause of the loss, it is apparent that the discrepancies between the cargo properties declared and the properties of the actual cargo loaded on board were contributory to the incident as a false sense of security for the safety of the cargo would have prevailed. 

The most recent meeting of IMO’s Carriage of Cargoes and Containers Sub-Committee agreed that special care needed to be taken whilst carrying Bauxite on board ships and emphasised the need for immediate action in order to prevent further loss of lives.  To this end a circular was agreed to further raise awareness of the possible dangers for liquefaction with the carriage of Bauxite and providing guidance to the Master on the acceptability of Bauxite cargoes.  It should be noted that it is stressed that if there is reason to doubt that the cargo being loaded is consistent with the shipper’s declaration then the Master should stop loading and have the shipper verify the properties of the cargo.   

IMO is currently investigating the hazards and risks associated with the carriage of Bauxite with ongoing work in a correspondence group; the outcome of this work is envisaged to result in a change to the IMO IMSBC Code schedule for Bauxite and the circular is intended as an interim action.

The circular attached has recently been released in its final form as an official IMO circular (CCC.1/Circ.2).  It is noted that the draft circular was circulated to the INTERCARGO Technical Committee Members following its agreement during CCC2, however it is felt that the fundamental importance of awareness of the potential dangers with this cargo cannot be over stressed, especially now that in many areas associated with the export of Bauxite the monsoon season is beginning.

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25 February 2017

Casualties and Transparency

Article Title Updated
List of bulk carrier incidents in 2017 and analysis

Update on 11 Apr 2017:-

INTERCARGO is deeply concerned at the tragic loss of the VLOC vessel STELLAR DAISY reported on 31 March 2017 (see our Media Release here).

It is also worrying that another VLOC (Stellar Unicorn) was reported suffering hull cracks on 7 Apr 2017.

In 2017 from 1 Jan to 11 Apr, there were 79 bulk carrier incidents reported in media channels. Analysis on those incidents highlighted:

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18 April 2017
Industry’s trends on loss prevention

Read news section here.

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28 March 2017
Bulk Carrier Casualty Report 2015

The INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty Report 2015 provides a list of reported losses of bulk carriers with dwt over 10,000 for previous ten years (2005 -2015), analysis of causes and the trends.

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25 February 2017
Lessons learned from marine casualties

With reference to the Report III 2/16 of the 2nd session of IMO’s Sub-committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III), enclosed is “Lessons learned from marine casualties”, following the review carried out by the IMO Secretariat in cooperation with III. All the information related to the casualty and the analysis of the reports of investigation can be accessed in the Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) module on maritime casualties and incidents.

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25 February 2017
Casualties and Transparency - Latest Developments

2 Dec 2016:-

By end Nov 2016, there were 184 incidents reported highlighting machinery failure, grounding and collision to be the main reasons of bulk carrier incidents:
• Machinery failure: 60 incidents
• Grounding: 51 incidents
• Collisions with other vessels: 45 incidents
• Fire/explosion: 8 incidents
• Hull damage: 6 incidents
• Others: 11 incidents

Wider range of search will be carried out to cover incidents of cargo failure etc.

23 Sept 2016: -

in addition to the update on 18 Mar, there were 3 more dry cargo ship incidents reported during period from 19 Mar to 122 Sept 2016:

No.10.   22 Mar: A 1980-built general cargo ship KM Bunga Melati XV hit a reef while approaching the port’s dock, suffered a breach in its hull and sank in the port of Tagulandang in Indonesia;

No.11.   16 May: Panamanian-flagged bulk carrier New Mykonos, dwt 161,121 built in 1997, which ran aground on January 29, south of Faux Cap, southern Madagascar, broke into two and sank.

No.12.   30 Jul: Bulk carrier Benita, dwt 44,183 built in 1998, which was under tow en route from Mauritius to India, sunk approximately 93.5 nautical miles from Mauritius.

 

18 Mar 2016: -

There were 9 dry cargo ship incidents reported during period from 1 Jan to 18 Mar 2016:
No.1. 9 Jan: bulker “China Star 107”, dwt 960, with five crew on board (presumed all lost), sank in East China Sea, owned by Chinese company Fuzhou Yonghua Shipping, carrying steel and wood from Shanghai to Fuzhou.

No.2. 11 Jan, Panama-flagged Russian general cargo vessel “City”, dwt 7,001, ran aground on a breakwater approaching Sakata port in Japan’s Yamagata Prefecture. The hull was breached. With 18 crew on board. No life loss reported.

No.3. 25 Jan, Venezuela-flagged general cargo ship “Alita”, dwt 4,250, sank off Colon, Panama, while awaiting scrapping at anchorage off Colon, Panama, after colliding with another vessel.

No.4. 26 Jan, Vietnamese general cargo ship “Dong Thien Phu Silver”, dwt 3762, owned by Ho Chi Minh City-based Dong Thien Phu Mien Nam, sank after it collided with the product tanker Ocean Osprey.

No.5. 28 Jan, Bulk carrier LOS LLANITOS, dwt71665, Mexican flag, most likely be dismantled where it ran aground near Mexico’s Barra de Navidad. Mexican Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (SCT) said that the first option would be to dismantle the vessel in place.

No.6. 2 Feb, A Mongolia-flagged bulk carrier “South Star”, dwt 27,652, caught fire while moored in Tonkin Bay, Hai Phong, Vietnam. The fire caused severe damage to the superstructure.

No.7. 18 Feb, general cargo vessel “Lintas Belawan”, dwt 8,294, caught fire off Masalembu Islands in Indonesia and sank soon after. The fire broke out in the engine room and spread throughout and caused an explosion aboard.

No.8. 29 Feb, Bulker “Bao Jiang 88” carrying 4,600 tons of ore concentrates (presume dwt around 5000), capsized and subsequently sank off Shanghai. It was reported improper trimming of the vessel’s cargo led to the sinking. No life was lost.

No.9. 14 Mar, general cargo vessel “Shen Zhou 33”, with 5 crew onboard, started listing due to a shift of the cargo and capsized and sank in the Taiwan Strait. No life was lost.

 

 

16 Mar 2016:-

INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty Report 2015, available for download here.

The Report was reviewed by Technical Committee and approved by Executive Committee on 8 Mar 2016. TradeWinds publishes an article bringing our concerns to the public.

Comments and views are welcome to reach info@intercargo.org.

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25 February 2017
Casualties and Transparency - Member Consulatation

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25 February 2017
Casualties and Transparency briefing

The primary INTERCARGO issue concerns the Annual Trend of Bulk Carrier Casualties, which are reported on an annual basis to IMO.

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25 February 2017

Corruption

Article Title Updated
INTERCARGO initiatives on Corruption - Jan. 2017

INTERCARGO participated at the

IHS Maritime & Trade Risk Forum 2017 (http://events.joc.com/maritime-risk-forum-2017/agenda/tuesday-january-24-2017)

in the panel about

LOW-LEVEL CORRUPTION: A HEIGHTENED RISK FOR SHIPPING COMPANIES.

  • The main points made by INTERCARGO are outlined in the attached.
  • Also attached (members only): January’s IHS Safety at Sea magazine hosts an article on corruption

where INTERCARGO has contributed with comments from our Chairman J. Platsidakis

and background material provided by the Secretariat.

Also attached INTERCARGO's Terminal Reporting Form.

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25 January 2017
Corruption Briefing

INTERCARGO had led a Round Table letter to all PSC MoUs suggesting the establishment of a fully independent Internal Affairs Review (IAR) panel where owners could be assured that complaints of corruption or negligence would receive a sympathetic and independent assessment. Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

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12 January 2017
Corruption - Latest Developments

Port state control and corruption were among the major concerns raised during INTERCARGO’s Technical Committee and Executive Committee meetings in Athens on 12 and 13 October 2015. Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

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12 January 2017
Corruption - Member Consultation

Members are reminded to submit examples of PSC corruption to the secretariat either by direct e-mail or by use of the Intercargo Terminal Reporting form than can be dowloaded here.

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14 December 2016

Criminalisation

Article Title Updated
Criminalisation Briefing

Traditionally linked to the Criminalisation of Seafarers after accidental pollution, this issue now encompasses other areas where shipowners and seafarers can be adversely affected such as “Places of Refuge”, Amici Curiae measures, other collective legal interventions, Port State Control (PSC) control corruption and national anti-bribery laws. 

 Firstly considering “Accidental Pollution”, responsible shipowners work very hard to meet all applicable regulations such as IMO’s MARPOL Convention. Deliberate pollution is indefensible but it should be noted that pollution from ships is in long-term decline as the following figures from Industry body, ITOPF (www.itopf.co.uk), confirms although these figures refer to tankers and similar vessels only

 Years

Quantity (tonnes)

1970-1979

3,195,000

1980-1989

1,174,000

1990-1999

1,133,000

2000-2009

213,000

2010-2013

22,000

Criminalisation of seafarers is viewed as one of the four principle Round Table issues kept under regular review by the associations.

Historically, INTERCARGO has always voiced its opposition to the criminalisation of seafarers for Accidental Pollution, including adding its name in 2010 to a Round Table paper in support of the “Hebei Spirit” seafarers.  It is iniquitous that seafarers can be arrested as a precautionary measure, contrary to natural justice. Shipping Associations such as INTERCARGO urge all Governments to implement the measures contained in the ILO-IMO Guidelines on the Fair Treatment of Seafarers in the event of a Maritime Accident” (Resolution LEG 3 (91) adopted on 27 April 2006). 

In terms of its support for IMO and the cause of consistent, global regulations, INTERCARGO added its support in 2009 to a group of concerned shipping interests seeking clarification of intent of the 2005 European Union Ship Source Pollution Directive. This then led to a ruling made by the European Court of Justice concerning the overlap between IMO’s MARPOL Convention and regional or national regulations implicit in the EU Directive, demonstrating that owners and their associations can leverage support by acting together in support of their seafarers.

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25 February 2017
Criminalisation - Latest Developments

Round Table international shipping associations including INTERCARGO have a unified position on Fair Treatment of Seafarers.

Unfair treatment of seafarers (e.g. prolonged detention/imprisonment) by port/coastal States following maritime accidents not only affects the seafarers concerned but has a wider impact on the entire industry and ultimately on the efficient and effective service of world trade. Specifically, unfair treatment affects the general morale of seafarers worldwide and has a negative impact on recruitment and retention. Criminal sanctions for accidental pollution may impede accident investigations by discouraging open and full cooperation on the part of seafarers, compromising the ability to identify the cause and prevent recurrence in the future.

IMO/ILO “Guidelines on Fair Treatment of Seafarers in the Event of a Maritime Accident” were adopted in 2006 in response to a series of high profile cases where seafarers were detained and/or imprisoned following pollution accidents (including the Erika, the Prestige and the Tasman Spirit). Subsequent cases (e.g. Hebei Spirit) prompted IMO and ILO in 2011 to urge States to implement the Guidelines and abide by them in all circumstances where seafarers are detained.

In addition, there are other instances in the course of routine ship operations where seafarers are treated unfairly by port States and terminal operators, including the denial of shore leave and access to medical treatment as provided for under the FAL Convention, Maritime Labour Convention and WHO International Health Regulations.

 

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25 February 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper on Fair Treatment of Seafarers

Unfair treatment of seafarers (e.g. prolonged detention/imprisonment) by port/coastal States following maritime accidents not only affects the seafarers concerned but has a wider impact on the entire industry and ultimately on the efficient and effective service of world trade. Specifically, unfair treatment affects the general morale of seafarers worldwide and has a negative impact on recruitment and retention. Criminal sanctions for accidental pollution may impede accident investigations by discouraging open and full cooperation on the part of seafarers, compromising the ability to identify the cause and prevent recurrence in the future.

IMO/ILO “Guidelines on Fair Treatment of Seafarers in the Event of a Maritime Accident” were adopted in 2006 in response to a series of high profile cases where seafarers were detained and/or imprisoned following pollution accidents (including the Erika, the Prestige and the Tasman Spirit). Subsequent cases (e.g. Hebei Spirit) prompted IMO and ILO in 2011 to urge States to implement the Guidelines and abide by them in all circumstances where seafarers are detained.

In addition, there are other instances in the course of routine ship operations where seafarers are treated unfairly by port States and terminal operators, including the denial of shore leave and access to medical treatment as provided for under the FAL Convention, Maritime Labour Convention and WHO International Health Regulations.

(refer to the enclosed pdf file for the full text of the Round Table Discussion Paper on Fair Treatment of Seafarers)

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25 February 2017
Press cuttings

28 Apr 2014 : PRESS CUTTINGS : In the press during April 2014 :- Chinese companies allege bribery in arbitration; Korean ferry disaster and Maritime Anti Corruption Network work.

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25 February 2017
Criminalisation - Member Consultation

The Intercargo Secretariat focal point for this subject is : info@INTERCARGO.org  Intercargo Members are invited to contact the focal point if they would like further information on any of the issues raised here. Intercargo meetings are held every six months

Intercargo does not currently have an internal Correspondence Group covering this issue although future Intercargo meetings may decide to set one up.  A Correspondence Group comprises optional focal points within Intercargo members so that information and consultative issues can be sent directly to the focal point and at the member’s option, feedback on a specific issue can be sent to the Secretariat between Intercargo meetings.

Correspondence Group members and their companies may be carried here in the future.

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25 February 2017
US responder Immunity

A short Update has been received from the International Group of P&I Club lead legal initiative on US Responder Immunity.

 

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25 February 2017
Issues

Prudent shipowners will naturally wish to have internal measures in place to ensure that their operations are commercially, legally and operationally sound.  These measures should take into account sovereignty issues such as the laws, customs and practices of the individual countries to which they trade, as well as the expectations and requirements of other stakeholders such as Flag State, Port State and Charterers.

As part of the fact finding exercise, we suggest that all INTERCARGO Members should review the information in either the printed “Regional Round Ups” before making a Port Call and consult the updated information on the Port State Control pages of this website.

If you receive a request to make facilitation or other similar payments – for example, to secure clearance of Ballast Water Management protocols in Black Sea ports or to secure Grain-Hold Cleanliness Certificates from Government Officials in South America, please ensure that you complete a Bulk Carrier Terminal Reporting Form so that we can begin to address these cases from the collective position of global Bulk Carrier owners.

Issues covered and available for consultation by INTERCARGO members in the relevant Committee or Correspondence Group are as follows :-

 

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25 February 2017
MACN Hamburg

INTERCARGO attended an MACN meeting in Hamburg, which discussed rolling back corruption in hot-spot countries and a training tool for Masters to say “no” to Facilitation Payment requests. 

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19 February 2017

Design Standards

Article Title Updated
4th session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction - SDC 4)

See the article on the Outcome of SDC 4 (4th session of the IMO Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction), 13-17 Feb 2017, at the link here.

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25 February 2017
IMO Goal Based Standards Presentation

During INTERCARGO's 35th Technical Committee meeting (London, October 2016), Peter Contraros delivered a comprehensive presentation on the IMO Goal Based Standards with an emphasis in the IMO Audit findings.

A copy of the presentation can be found on the TechComm page (member login required)

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO comments on IACS Draft Rule Change Proposal RCP 2

INTERCARGO performed a review of the second Rule Change Proposal (RCP 2) and accompanying Technical Background and  informed IACS, by letter,  of the comments and concerns.A copy of the letter can be found here (member login required)

In summary INTERCARGO is very concerned with the downgrading of welding requirements at critical locations with what appears to be no technical justification:

  • Hopper Sloping Plate to Inner Bottom Plate – Downgrade from full or partial penetration to partial penetration only.
  • Transverse Web Frame to Hopper Sloping Plate – Downgrade from partial penetration welding to fillet welding only.
  • Transverse Bulkhead (TB) Lower Stool Top Plate to TB Lower Stool Side Plate – Downgrade from full penetration welding  to partial penetration welding.

INTERCARGO expressed  concern that,  in addition to the decrease of strength/increase of stress that will be a result of the downgrades, the lack of full penetration welding will also affect the ability to fully assess the weld quality. Additionally, the lack of prescriptive requirements, within the Common Structural Rules (CSR), for enhanced inspections of the critical locations at new build will worsen the situation resulting in the welds at these locations not lasting the CSR design life.

INTERCARGO also expressed their disappointment that the Rule Change Proposal did not align the various Class Societies’ NDE requirements (i.e. number of checkpoints) rather than leaving it to the discretion of the individual Class Society, which we believe is not in the spirit of the Common Structural Rules or SOLAS

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO comments on IACS Draft Rule Change Proposal RCP 1

INTERCARGO performed a review of IACS Draft Rule Change Proposal RCP 1 and provided the IACS Secretariat with a number of comments.  The letter, containing INTERCARGO's comments and concerns can be found here (member login required). A summary of the comments are as follows:

Part 1, Chapter 2, Section 4, 2.1.1 – Means of Access

INTERCARGO requests that  a cross reference to SOLAS Ch. XII Reg. 6-2.2, which stipulates minimum clear passage dimensions for access in double skinned bulk carriers, to be added.

Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 3  - 1.2.1 – Corrosion Addition Determination – Table 1

The RCP allows  for a  downgrade of corrosion allowance on the lower part of; plane bulkheads or bulkheads fitted without a stool. INTERCARGO questions the technical justification of this rule change.

Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 6  - 4.3.4 – Arm length (Tripping Brackets) & 10.4.10 – Upper stool

INTERCARGO asks for removal of  the non-technical term “general”  which the RCP adds to the existing rules.

Part 1, Chapter 7, Section 3 - 2.1.1 – List of Structural Details

INTERCARGO questions why fine mesh analysis is still  not mandatory for the fore and aft region of the vessel.

Part 1, Chapter 9, Section 6 - Table 5 – Design Standard E

The RCP allows for the downgrading of welding requirements at the connection the inner bottom to side girder in way of the hopper knuckle. INTERCARGO requests that the existing requirements are kept and states that an upgrade of the welding in this area is justified for this critical joint.

Part 1, Chapter 12, Section 3  - 4.2.4 – Slot Welds on Hatch Covers

The RCP removes the requirements for the size and spacing of slot welds on hatch covers, leaving the requirements for this detail up to the individual Class Society, INTERCARGO does not believe that that this is in the spirit of the Common Structural Rules or of the IMO Goal Based Standards.

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25 February 2017
Guideline for design and operation of vessels with bulk cargo that may liquefy

Liquefaction is a phenomenon in which a soil-like material is abruptly transformed from a solid dry state to an almost fluid state. Many common bulk cargoes, such as iron ore fines, nickel ore and various mineral concentrates, are examples of materials that may liquefy.


If liquefaction occurs on board a vessel, the stability will be reduced due to the free surface effect and cargo shift, possibly resulting in capsizing of the vessel. The ship structure may also be damaged due to increased cargo pressures.


DNV GL has written a guideline for the design and operation of vessels with bulk cargoes that may liquefy. The intention of this guideline is to raise the awareness of the risks of cargo liquefaction on ships and to describe what mitigating actions may be taken to reduce such risks. The target group is ship designers, yards, shipowners and other stakeholders in the shipping industry.

 

Refer to the enclosed publications, with appreciations to DNV GL:

  • Bulk Carrier Update Article Cargo Liquefaction
  • Bulk Cargo Liquefaction Guideline for design and operation

The publications can also be downloaded from DNV GL webpage click here.

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25 February 2017
Progress report on coating issues and action plan

The enclosed Progress report on coating issues and action plan covers:

1. Progress at INTERCARGO Technical Committee
2. SOLAS and PSPC Standard
3. IACS framework on PSPC
4. NACE International’s initiative
5. Actions requested from INTERCARGO members
Annex 1: NACE’s proposal on PSPC Study, 14 Dec 2015

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25 February 2017
Design Standards - Member Consulatation

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25 February 2017
Design Standards - Latest Developments

(25 Jan 2016)

Outcome of 3rd session of IMO Sub-committee on Ship Design and Construction (SDC 3)

IMO’s Ship Design and Construction Sub-Committee held its 3rd session (SDC 3) on 18-22 Jan 2016. The essence of the meetings is related to passenger ship safety as follows up to the incident of cruise ship Costa Concordia. For bulk carriers, following items are relevant for reference:

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25 February 2017
Critique on IACS H-CSR and KC to IACS Council

At the last IACS Council meeting on 10 Dec 2015, INTERCARGO introduced a critique on how the IACS’ Harmonised Common Structure Rules (CSR-H) is being applied to bulk carriers through the IACS Knowledge Centre (KC) output; the enclosed “Appraisal of IACS KCs (Knowledge Centre) for Common Structural Rules – Harmonised [version 1st January 2014 & 1st January 2015]” carried out by INTERCARGO was presented to the IACS Council for a later response. This was follow up to the action plan agreed at the INTERCARGO meetings in Athens on 12-13 Oct 2015.

 

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25 February 2017
Common Structural Rules (CSR) 25 February 2017
Design Standards Briefing

Issue Summary

Intercargo continues to monitor the development common structural rules for bulk carriers and rule amendments on an ongoing basis. Goal Based Standards are being developed by the IMO and are essentially 'rules for rules' that will have an impact upon the current system of technical regulation.

Intercargo Policy

Common Structural Rules (CSR) - Intercargo supports the principle of CSR on the grounds that it helps to remove competition between Classification Societies on the optimisation of scantlings. Intercargo monitors the development and maintenance of the rules with the aim of ensuring the members’ feedback is appropriately incorporated into the development process.

Goal Based Standards (GBS) - The International Goal-based Ship Construction Standards for Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers describe the goals and establish the functional requirements that the rules for ship design shall meet. The GBS also require that such rules shall be verified as meeting the goals and functional requirements. In this sense the GBS can be considered ‘rules for rules’. Intercargo supports the principle of transparent goals and criteria and is considering issues of verification further as they develop.


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25 February 2017
Goal Based Standards (GBS) 25 February 2017

Environmental Legislation

Article Title Updated
USCG BWTS Type Approval Status

Information on the BWT Systems that have USCG Type Approval and also on those systems that are currently under review for USCG Type Approval (as of 16 May 2017).

 

 

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16 May 2017
INTERCARGO submissions to IMO MEPC 71

INTERCARGO has submitted 2 papers to the 71st session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 71) under agenda item 4 Harmful Aquatic Organisms In Ballast Water.

Paper MEPC 71/4/19 - Challenges faced by bulk carrier owners and operators

This paper describes the challenges that retrofitting a BWTS on to those vessels that use gravity discharged Top Side Tanks and proposes a draft amendment to regulation B-3.

Paper MEPC 71/INF.20 - Information on the technical and operational challenges of retrofitting ballast water treatment systems on existing bulk carriers

This paper describes some of the other challenges (such as powering requirements, availability of space) faced by the bulk carrier industry.

Both papers are availble for download below.

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11 June 2017
Open article / commentary on BWM Legislation Implementation

See link here.

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25 April 2017
Ballast Water Treatment System Database

The INTERCARGO Secretariat is developing a database that will contain information on Ballast Water Treatment Systems that have been fitted on Members's vessels, this information will then be shared with Full Members.

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25 April 2017
INTERCARGO Ballast Water Update - BWTS Manufacturer Survey

The Secretariat has been contacting Ballast Water Treatment System (BWTS)  manufacturers to collect information that may be of interest to members.

The information includes;

  • Manufacturers’ experience of fitting BWTS onto new build vessels and retrofits
  • Production capacity
  • Status of USCG Approval

and can be found in document Ballast Water Update 10.04.17, see below (member login required)

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23 April 2017
Comments on BWM implementation challenges

See Association news here.

 

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23 April 2017
BWM regulation initiatives

Following our Association's Executive Committee & Technical Committee meetings in Hong Kong on March 6-7 (see link), the Secretariat has been working on the promotion of INTERCARGO’s positions:

CMA SHIPPING 2017 CONFERENCE (see link)

U.S. Coast Guard

Round Table

SUBMISSIONS TO IMO MEPC 71

Members please login to read the updates.

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31 March 2017
BWM Presentations

During the Association's Technical Committee meeting in Hong Kong on the 6th March 2017, two presentations related to BWM were delivered, please click here. (member login required)

 

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29 March 2017
Catastrophic Failure of a Ballast Water Treatment System

In August 2016, a Ballast Water Treatment System fitted onboard a semi-submersible installation suffered from a catastrophic failure which caused the loss of the system and damage to surrounding equipment and fittings.

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO Ballast Water Update

A circular was sent to members that included information on:

  • USCG Approved Systems
  • USCG Extensions
  • IMO Approved Systems
  • De-coupling of IOPP Certificate
  • INTERCARGO Ballast Water Working Group

Click here for more.......(member login required)

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO Ballast Water Working Group

The INTERCARGO Secretariat and Members of the INTERCARGO Technical Committee have formed a Ballast Water Working Group. The Group have been tasked with producing a paper, for submission to MEPC 71 (July 2017), which will highlight the challenges of retro-fitting a Ballast Water Treatment System onto existing Bulk Carriers.

If any Member wishes to join this Working Group, please contact the Secretariat.

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25 February 2017
“Ballast Water Regulative Update”

13 Jan. 2017:-

The Secretariat is sharing the attached internal information document (only for members - please login to access)

“Ballast Water Regulative Update”

and invites your comments or any additional input to be sent to: info@intercargo.org.

This will help us further elaborate on the real challenges and problems

faced by Shipowners, managers, and operators of dry bulk vessels.

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO attended the IMarEST Ballast Water Technology Conference

12 Jan. 2017:-

Please see background information here, while a follow-up report for Members will be posted soon.

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25 February 2017
Assessment of UV BWMS under US Type Approval Testing

13 July 2016:-

The U.S. Coast Guard has denied appeals from four ballast water treatment system manufacturers to allow the most probable number (MPN) method for determining the efficacy of systems.

• On Dec 14, 2015, USCG denied requests from 4 BWMS manufacturers to use an alternative testing method (ATM) for approval of their UV-based BWMS. All four appealed the decision, requesting that the Coast Guard consider a most probable number (MPN)-based method as equivalent to the required testing procedure.

• On July 12, 2016, the Coast Guard issued final agency action denying these appeals. This denial also has no immediate impact on shipping. These UV systems are still accepted for use by USCG as Alternate Management Systems.

• The MPN method evaluates the likelihood of reproduction among organisms. The initial Coast Guard review concluded that the requested MPN test method does not meet the requirements for an alternative method stipulated in the regulation.

• USCG’s decision is not a denial of UV systems or of MPN; it is a denial of the proposed alternative testing method by four UV system manufacturers.

• There are 20 BWMS manufacturers currently involved in testing for Coast Guard approval using testing standards published in Coast Guard regulations.

The USCG has very recently released its decision on the use of the ‘Most Probable Number method’ as an equivalent alternative to its prescribed test method evaluation of the performance of a BWMS. The following brief internet article posted by the ‘Marine Propulsion & Auxiliary Machinery’ magazine provides a precis of the ruling.

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25 February 2017
BWM: 3 Systems approved by USCG in Dec. 2016
 

28 Dec. 2016:-

See relevant posting here.

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25 February 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper on Ballast Water Management

Date of update: 11 December 2014

The shipping industry is faced with the entry into force of an International Convention (International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004) which has fundamental flaws in its method of implementation. These flaws:

1. the lack of certainty that the technology being approved by Governments will meet the biological discharge standards being demanded by the Convention; and,

2. that the port State control enforcement mechanism stipulated in the Convention and implemented through the various relevant Guidelines further compounds this uncertainty in compliance.

Further complexity in compliance stems from the increasing tendency for unilateral legislation which is not harmonised with the international regime.

(refer to the pdf file for full text of the Round Table Discussion Paper)

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25 February 2017
INTERCARGO is supporting the 6th IMarEST Ballast Water Technology Conference

December 2016:-

See relevant posting here.

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25 February 2017
USCG and Ballast Water Management (BWM) System Approval

13 July 2016:-

The U.S. Coast Guard has denied appeals from four ballast water treatment system manufacturers to allow the most probable number (MPN) method for determining the efficacy of systems.

• On Dec 14, 2015, USCG denied requests from 4 BWMS manufacturers to use an alternative testing method (ATM) for approval of their UV-based BWMS. All four appealed the decision, requesting that the Coast Guard consider a most probable number (MPN)-based method as equivalent to the required testing procedure.

• On July 12, 2016, the Coast Guard issued final agency action denying these appeals. This denial also has no immediate impact on shipping. These UV systems are still accepted for use by USCG as Alternate Management Systems.

• The MPN method evaluates the likelihood of reproduction among organisms. The initial Coast Guard review concluded that the requested MPN test method does not meet the requirements for an alternative method stipulated in the regulation.

• USCG’s decision is not a denial of UV systems or of MPN; it is a denial of the proposed alternative testing method by four UV system manufacturers.

• There are 20 BWMS manufacturers currently involved in testing for Coast Guard approval using testing standards published in Coast Guard regulations.

 

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25 February 2017
MEPC 71 to be held 3-7 July 2017

16 Nov. 2016:-

The next MEPC 71 has been rescheduled for 3-7 July 2017 (from the initially planned 8-12 May dates).

For one thing, this brings any MEPC 71 agreement about ships’ requirement to fit BWMS

further closer  to the BWM Convention Entry into Force date of 8 September 2017.

See IMO section article.

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25 February 2017
Update on Ballast Water Management at IMO and in the US

Update on Ballast Water Management at IMO and in the US

Please download the enclosed INTERCARGO Update on BWM at IMO and in the US, dated on 2 Oct 2015.

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25 February 2017

Lifting Appliances

Article Title Updated
Lifting Appliance Failures

During the Association's Technical Committee meeting in Hong Kong on the 6th March 2017, Chris Dyson of Brookes Bell delivered  presentation on Crane Failures which can be found here (member login required)

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29 March 2017
Lifting appliance and cargo gear

Lifting appliance and cargo gear

INTERCARGO Technical Committee's view

At last TC meeting in Mar 2015, Members noted developments in this IMO agenda item and agreed the importance of good design; approval and maintenance issues were also considered in need of greater attention. Concern was expressed that some of the cranes now being supplied were not marine cranes, and that this was causing additional reliability problems.

IMO’s general course of action

IMO is considering on which SOLAS chapter should be amended and to develop the list of industry codes and/or standards to be contained in a footnote or an MSC circular.

IMO Correspondence Group on lifting appliances and winches

MSC 95 decided to establish a Correspondence Group (CG) on Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches with following terms of reference, under the coordination of Japan:

1) develop draft guidelines to cover the design, fabrication and construction for new installations; onboard procedures for routine inspection, maintenance and operation of lifting appliances and winches; and familiarization of ship's crew and shore-based personnel;

2) prepare draft goal- and function-based SOLAS regulations requiring that onboard lifting appliances and winches be designed, constructed and installed either "in accordance with codes or standards acceptable to the Organization" or "to the satisfaction of the Administration"; and maintained in accordance with guidelines for safety onboard lifting appliances and winches to be developed by IMO.

CG started to work on 15 Jun 2015 with INTERCARGO as one of its members. The 2nd round discussion started on 29 Sept 2015 will conclude by 22 Oct 2015. Details of 2nd round issues refer to the enclosed pdf file.

ENDS

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19 February 2017
Lifting Appliances Briefing

(updated on 17 Dec 2105)

Position of INTERCARGO

The Members of the INTERCARGO Technical Committee noted developments in the IMO agenda item and agreed the importance of good design; approval and maintenance issues were also considered in need of greater attention. Concern was expressed that some of the cranes now being supplied were not marine cranes, and that this was causing additional reliability problems. Members determined that an Intercargo correspondence group should be initiated to further consider the issues that could be associated with cargo gear on bulk carriers and also request approval of the Executive Committee for an additional workshop to be arranged specifically on these issues.

 

Background

Over the last 10 years there have been a number of accidents involving onboard lifting appliances, some of which have resulted in fatalities. Recognising that this is unacceptable the IMO has been looking at ways to improve the situation. It was reported that the root cause of the majority of accidents has been identified as lack of maintenance or poor/incorrect operation.

MSC 89 in May 2011 approved a new task on "Development of requirements for onboard lifting appliances and winches”;

Before June 2013, IMO made contact with ILO on this matter for input.

SSE 1 in March 2014 decided that there should be a further period for collection and analysis of additional data and corroborative evidence before any decision could be taken on whether there is a need to take any measures. The scope, extent and application of any measures and whether this should be mandatory through amendments to SOLAS or non-mandatory guidance could then be considered and agreed by SSE.

SSE 2 in March 2015 requested MSC 95 to decide on whether mandatory SOLAS requirements need to be prepared in addition to the development of guidelines for safety onboard lifting appliances and winches.

MSC 95 in Jun 2015 decided to set up a correspondence group to deal with the issue.

 

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17 December 2015
Lifting Appliances - Latest Developments

(Updated on 17 Dec 2015)

MSC 95 in June 2015 decided to establish a Correspondence Group (CG) on Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches with following terms of reference, under the coordination of Japan:

1) develop draft guidelines to cover the design, fabrication and construction for new installations; onboard procedures for routine inspection, maintenance and operation of lifting appliances and winches; and familiarization of ship's crew and shore-based personnel;

2) prepare draft goal- and function-based SOLAS regulations requiring that onboard lifting appliances and winches be designed, constructed and installed either "in accordance with codes or standards acceptable to the Organization" or "to the satisfaction of the Administration"; and maintained in accordance with guidelines for safety onboard lifting appliances and winches to be developed by IMO.

The outcome of the CG will be submitted to SSE3 to be held on Monday, 14 to Friday, 18 March 2016. Final draft of the submission is enclosed here for download.

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17 December 2015
Lifting Appliances - Member Consulatation

Text below is only available to logged in users ("read more")

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02 November 2015

Loading Rates

Article Title Updated
Loading Rates Briefing

Issue Summary.

Over recent years INTERCARGO members have been experiencing increased pressure to load vessels quickly. This problem has escalated with the increased demand for commodities and the commercial pressure to maximise terminal throughput.

INTERCARGO conducted a survey of ships’ masters to determine the areas of concern, two main areas were identified:

  1. the implied arrival condition required to meet onerous loading requirements and its detrimental effect on manoeuvrability; and
  2. the consequences for the structural integrity of the ship.

INTERCARGO Policy.

INTERCARGO will engage with all stakeholders including owners and operators, terminals, classification societies, shippers, flag administrations, and insurers to ensure a common understanding of this issue. The aim is to ensure that all bulk carriers are loaded safety in an appropriate manner, taking into account the capabilities of the ship, in accordance with international regulation

Summary of Recent Developments.

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24 September 2015
Loading Rates - Latest Developments

(Updated on 17 Dec 2015)

Background

Around 2003, INTERCARGO members raised their concern about excessive loading rates loading rate of iron ore cargo pouring into cargo hold. Some port requested a rate of 16000 t/hr with minimum ballast. A survey was carried out by INTERCARGO with result:

  • 85% of masters indicated that they considered such a rate of loading to be beyond the safe operational limits of their vessel's manoeuvrability and hull structure
  • Two thirds of respondents stated they had concerns with regard to structural stresses if loading at such a rate.

Refer to the enclosed INTERCARGO presentations of "the Speed of Loading of Bulk Carriers" in 2008 and "Design Issues for Bulk Carriers" in 2009.

 

IMO Requirements:

Listening to Industry feedback, IMO took actions:

  • On 16 May 2005, IMO issued circular MSC/Circ.1160 on Manual on loading and unloading of solid bulk cargoes for Terminal representatives;
  • On 5 Feb 2015, it issued circular MSC.1/Circ.1230 on Amendments to the manual on loading and unloading of solid bulk cargoes for terminal representatives;
  • In 2004, Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes was adopted by IMO resolution MSC.193(79).
  • From 1 Jan 2011, the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code entered into force, which superseded the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.

 

Publication of UK MCA

Safe loading and unloading of bulk carriers, 2003

 

IACS Recommendations

Recommendation 46: BULK CARRIERS - Guidance and Information on Bulk Cargo Loading and Discharging to Reduce the Likelihood of Over-stressing the Hull Structure, 1997

Bulk Carriers Handle With Care

 

 

 

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17 December 2015
Loading Rates - Member Consulatation

Text below is only available to logged in users ("read more")

Members views, comments and proposals are welcome to reach Intercargo Secretariat via email info@intercargo.org.

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02 November 2015

Piracy

Article Title Updated
Update on piracy incidents between 13 Mar and 1 Apr 2017

Updated on 3 Apr 2017:-

There were 3 hijackings near Somalia between 13 Mar and 1 Apr 2017:

• bunkering tanker MT Aris 13 hijacked on 13 Mar 2017 en route to Mogadishu from Djibouti and approximately 18 km off the northern tip of Somalia; On 16 Mar 16 2017, her crew and the tanker were released from Somali pirate hands due to the efforts of the Puntland Maritime Police Force (PMPF). (http://eunavfor.eu/eu-naval-force-somalia-confirms-fuel-tanker-aris-13-and-crew-are-safe-and-on-their-way-to-safe-port-after-armed-pirates-depart-ship/)
• ocean going dhow MV Casayr II hijacked on 24 Mar 2017; The dhow has been released on 26 Mar by the pirates after taking one skiff, food and diesel. (https://www.ukmto.org/indian-ocean).
• dhow MV Al Kausar (or Al Kaushar) hijacked off Socotra island on 1 Apr 2017. Pirates took the dhow to Eyl, Somalia (http://eunavfor.eu/eu-naval-force-confirms-indian-dhow-seized-by-pirates-off-coast-of-somalia/)

It is reported that:
• it is highly likely that there are 3 pirate attack groups at sea in the HRA at present off the east coast of northern Somalia.
• the threat of attack by Somali pirates within 300 NM distance from the East coast of Somalia is currently HIGH.

 

Update on 17 Mar 2017:-

The EU Naval Force (Somalia) confirmed on 16 Mar 2017:

  • Fuel tanker Aris 13 and her crew are now en route to a safe port on the north coast of Somalia after armed pirates, who had been holding the crew since Monday 13 March 2017, departed the ship. The master confirmed that his crew had suffered no injuries during their 4-day ordeal.
  • It is understood that members of the Puntland Maritime Police Force assisted with the ship’s release and are currently on board.
  • Further details about the release are still to be confirmed.

What happened on 13 Mar 2017:-

A detailed update on a serious piracy incident, possibly a hijackin happened on 13 Mar 2017, is available on 14 Mar 2017 from the EU navy headquarters (EU NAVFOR). The Merchant Tanker (MT) ARIS 13 was reportedly taken by an unknown group and taken to the shore in the vicinity of CALUULA, PUNTLAND on 13 Mar 2017.

Assessment of the incident by EU NAVFOR is as follows:

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04 April 2017
EU NAVFOR meeting - Jan. 2017

INTERCARGO participated on January 17 at a:

-          Strategic meeting with the EU NAVFOR command to review piracy developments and the future of the operation

Relevant outcomes and developments will be discussed in our upcoming meetings in Hong Kong.

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19 February 2017
Piracy Briefing

Joint War Committee updates the Hull War, Piracy, Terrorism and Related Perils Listed Areas

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25 February 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper on Piracy and Armed Robbery

Piracy and Armed Robbery against ships endangers the lives of seafarers and imperils ships, their cargoes, and freedom of navigation. Piracy and Armed Robbery thrives on criminality ashore and impacts on the world economy and the cost of goods. The RT believes it is the responsibility of all coastal states to establish and enforce security in their territorial waters, their EEZ, and on the High Seas. Currently Piracy and the threat of piracy is affecting shipping in the Western Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Guinea and in South East Asia.

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19 February 2017
Vigilance still crucial as piracy High Risk Area in the Indian Ocean reduced

Vigilance still crucial as piracy High Risk Area in the Indian Ocean reduced

Organisations representing the global shipping and oil industry have announced that the size of the ‘High Risk Area’ for piracy in the Indian Ocean has been reduced and issued new advice to merchant ship operators.

This reduction to the High Risk Area is in response to the ongoing containment of pirate attacks in the Indian Ocean, but a group of shipping and oil industry organisations (BIMCO, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO and the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF) stressed that a serious threat remains and that correct reporting and vigilance remains crucial.

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19 February 2017
Piracy - Latest Developments

21 Nov 2016:-

1. Further clarification regarding transiting the Bab el Mandeb (BeM) straits

About transiting the Bab el Mandeb (BeM) straits during daylight hours and using the western TSS, the following diagram from UKMTO provides further clarification: TSS west and south of Hanish Al Kabra as ships exit the BeM strait:

BeM strait

As a precaution, masters should consider the following: maintain the farthest possible distance from the Yemen coast, transit the Bab el Mandeb straits during daylight hours, use the western TSS, increase speed, maintain vigilance and report any unusual activity to UKMTO.

2. US Navy webpage shows (http://www.oni.navy.mil/Intelligence-Community/Piracy/):
NGA Special Warning 134: Red Sea, Bab-el-Mandeb Strait and Gulf of Aden Commercial vessels in the region of the Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait and the Gulf of Aden should operate under a heightened state of alert as increasing tensions in the region escalate the potential for direct or collateral damage to vessels transiting the region. These threats may come from a variety of different sources such as missiles, projectiles or waterborne improvised explosive devices. Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for an 01 October attack on a UAE vessel. Vessels in the region should report hostile activities immediately and contact coalition naval forces via VHF bridge to bridge radio, e-mail: catleader@me.navy.mil, phone: 973 1785 3879.

3. Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Region – U.S. Navy Forces Special Warning
AA: All merchant vessels and maritime interests operating in the waters of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden are to be cognizant of the current status of terrorist operations in vicinity of Bab-el-Mandeb Strait. As a result of the continued political instability and ongoing insurgency in Yemen, belligerent forces in the vicinity of the Strait of Bab-el-Mandeb have enhanced their maritime and surveillance and demonstrated the capability for engagement of surface vessels within the area. Most likely targets are assessed to be military vessels; however, merchant vessels transiting the Strait may face increased risk from collateral damage.
BB: On 1 Oct, 2016 the Swift HSV-2, a UAE flagged vessel, was attacked in vicinity of the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait off the Yemen Mocha coastline. The attack was conducted by belligerents operating in Yemen who targeted the vessel and launched missiles or rockets which damaged Swift. Swift was towed away to Eritrea with no casualties reported.
CC: On 9 Oct, 2016, a U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer operating north of the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait was fired upon from the western Yemeni coastline. The missile attack failed with no damage to the ship or injuries to the crew.
DD: Conditions in Yemen have increased the potential for maritime attacks by extremist groups not unlike those implicated in these attacks. Recommend vessels operating in restricted waters be especially vigilant and remain as far west and south of Yemen as practicable including using the Western Traffic Separation Scheme in the northern Bab-el-Mandeb Strait, maintaining best speed, and transit the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait during daylight hours. Masters can expect to see an increased coalition warship presence in the Bab-el-Mandeb straits as a precaution.
EE: Any unusual activities or hostile or potentially hostile action observed by mariners within this region should be reported to Coalition naval vessels using Channel 16, via e-mail at cusnc.bwc@me.navy.mil or by phone 011-973-1785-3879.
FF: Additionally, communications required by the U.S. Coast Guard MARSEC 104-6 directive state that Masters should remain in contact with the United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations (UKMTO) and the U.S. Naval Cooperation and Guidance of Shipping (NCAGS) at cusnc.ncags_bw@me.navy.mil to the maximum extent possible.
GG: Coalition naval forces can be expected to conduct Maritime Awareness Calls, queries, and approaches in order to ensure the safety of vessels transiting the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.
HH: All U.S. flagged vessels approaching Coalition naval forces are advised to maintain radio contact on bridge-to-bridge channel 16. This notice is effective immediately and will remain in effect until further notice.

7 Oct 2016:-

Conflict in Yemen

Attention is drawn to the guidance issued by the United Kingdom Maritime Trade Office (UKMTO) in Advisory Notice 003/OCT/16, copied below. Industry has had is no indication or evidence the merchant shipping community is a target and the UKMTO advisory is forwarded to assist ships in taking actions to minimise the risks of becoming accidentally involved in the Yemeni Conflict.

ADVISORY NOTICE 003/OCT/16, UKMTO

1. Category: Maritime Security Incident/SOLAS - Update

2. Description: On 1 Oct 16 UKMTO advised of a vessel on fire at 0102 UTC in posn 13 06N, 043 08E (Bab el Mandeb straits). Indications are this incident is linked with the Yemen conflict and was a targeted attack from ashore on a specific UAE flagged vessel. Masters can expect to see an increased coalition warship presence in the Bab el Mandeb straits and as a precaution, should consider the following: maintain the farthest possible distance from the Yemen coast, transit the Bab el Mandeb straits during daylight hours, use the western TSS, increase speed, maintain vigilance and report any unusual activity to UKMTO.

3. Any queries regarding this Advisory Notice ring 0044 2392 222060 only for further information:

UKMTO Watchkeeper
Email: UKMTO@eim.ae
Emergency Tel: +971 5055 23215
Tel: +442392222060
Fax: +971(0)43094254

 

20 Jun 2016: -

The Maritime Trade Information Sharing Centre – Gulf of Guinea (MTISC-GoG) closed at 0800 GMT on 20th June 2016.

New Reporting Structure – MDAT-GoG:
      o A new FR/UK Centre called Marine Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT-GoG) commenced operations at 0800 GMT on 20th June 2016. MDAT-GoG will be operated by the Navies of France and the UK from centres in Brest, France and Portsmouth, England.
      o MDAT-GoG contact details:
        Email: watchkeepers@mdat-gog.org
        Telephone: +33(0)2 98 22 88 88
o Maritime Security Chart of GoG region A PDF version of the new chart (Q6114 Edition 2) can be downloaded from here.

Click here to download BMP4 (the 4th version of “Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy”).

Click here to download the amendment to BMP4.

Click here to download the "Guidelines for Owners, Operators and Masters for protection against piracy in the Gulf of Guinea region", v.2 June 2016.

Click here for more information about piracy issues.

 

16 Jun 2016: -

1. General analysis

The webpage at https://www.icc-ccs.org/piracy-reporting-centre/live-piracy-report (the IMB ICC Live Piracy & Armed Robbery Report 2016) shows 90 cases of attacks in 2016. A quick analysis shows that the 90 cases happened in following areas:

Areas Asia Indian Ocean West Africa South America
Number of incidents 36 18 29 7
% of total 40.0% 20.0% 32.2% 7.8%
Remarks 22 of the 36 cases happened within waters of Indonesia and Malaysia. 13 of the 18 cases happened within waters of India; and 2 cases happened around Gulf of Aden.

24 of the 29 cases happened within waters of Nigeria

 

 

In addition to the website of IMB ICC, UKMTO circulates weekly update on piracy issues mainly for the Indian Ocean and Somalia regions. You may contact them for the update via:

Commander Peter Harriman Royal Navy | Officer-in-Charge, UKMTO | British Embassy Dubai, PO Box 65 | Mil Address – Naval Party 1023, BFPO 490
*email: dubai-OiC@ukmto.org | (Office: +971(0)43094268)|(Mobile: +971(0)505545477)|(Fax: +971(0)43094254)|(ftn: 8485 4266)

2. Nigeria and Gulf of Guinea

The waters of Nigeria and Gulf of Guinea have been the focuses in 2016. It was reported on 6 Jun 2016 that:
A laden oil tanker reported that a mother vessel with 2 skiffs on each side of the vessel, was chasing the tanker in pos: 05.22.7 N & 002.24.3 E at 16:40 UTC. It was a grey hull mother vessel around 60 meters long with 2 black skiffs, one at sea level and the other housed. Evasive manoeuvres were carried out at maximum speed, water jet and fog horn were being used, and after 20 minutes, the vessel gave up the chase. All crew members are safe.

Pirate activity in the Gulf of Guinea:

Kidnapping. Kidnap for Ransom against merchant vessels has significantly increased in areas off of the Niger Delta: at least 16 of the kidnapping victims so far in this year are commercial seafarers.

Violence. Pirates are becoming more violent and aggressive and often initiate attacks by firing at the bridge to intimidate the crew prior to boarding.

Range. Pirates’ operational range has increasing: several incidents occurred more than 50nm from the Nigerian coast and the MV Leon Dias incident occurred at over 100nm.

Adaptation. The Pirates seem to be exploring a new tactics and expanded range: the recently hijacked M/V Maximus, taken off of Abidjan over 600nm from the Niger Delta is remarkably similar to the F/V Lu Rong Yuan Yu 917 attack on 30 Jan, 2015.

 

15 Jun 2016: -

The Maritime Trade Information Sharing Centre – Gulf of Guinea (MTISC-GoG, http://mtisc-gog.org/ ) will close before end of Jun 2016 following the successful conclusion of the Pilot Project, and France and the United Kingdom will commence a new virtual reporting centre, allowing the mission established by the MTISC to continue.

Over the past months, together with key stakeholders, OCIMF has carefully reviewed the outcomes of the MTISC-GoG Pilot Project, with the aim of establishing a sustainable reporting programme. The French and UK authorities, taking into account both their own experience and the role of MTISC-GoG in the region, have decided to offer a new contribution to the maritime information network in the Gulf of Guinea through a virtual reporting centre.

New Reporting Mechanism – MDAT-GoG
A new FR/UK mechanism for Maritime Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT-GoG) commenced operations at 0800 GMT on 20th June 2016. MDAT-GoG will be operated by the Navies of France and the UK from their Centres in Brest, France and Portsmouth, England.

MDAT-GoG contact details:

Email: watchkeepers@mdat-gog.org
Telephone: +33 (0)2 98 22 88 88
Calls to this number will be answered either in Brest or in Portsmouth.

Maritime Security Chart
A PDF version of the new chart (Q6114 Edition 2) can be downloaded from here. Notice to Mariners will provide details of the electronic chart and a printed version will be available at the end of June.

MTISC-GoG website
The MTISC-GoG website will be taken down at 0800 GMT on 20th June and replaced with a holding page providing the contact details for the new FR/UK structure.

MTISC-GoG Maritime Security Guidance (MSG)
MSG will no longer be supported or updated after 20th June and will be withdrawn from the OCIMF and MTISC-GoG websites.

Emails to MTISC-GoG to be forwarded to the new FR/UK Centre
To help with the transition of reporting to the new FR/UK reporting structure, MTISC-GoG began forwarding copies of reporting emails from vessels to the new FR/UK structure at 0800GMT on 14th June. Companies/vessels were requested to advise if they did not want to have their emails forwarded.

If companies do not give permission for their emails to be forwarded they are requested to advise MTISC-GoG as soon as possible otherwise no action is required.
FR/UK authorities have confirmed that all emails forwarded to FR/UK centre during this period will not be forwarded to any third party and will be deleted by 17th July.

Data Security
MTISC-GoG can confirm all data provided to the centre during its course of operation will be deleted.
MTISC-GoG would like to thank all those who have reported to the Centre for their support over the last two years.

 

6 Jun 2016: -

At the G7++ Friends of the Gulf of Guinea (FOGG) meeting in Lisbon on 06 June, 2016, the Governments of France and the United Kingdom announced their intent to offer a new contribution to the maritime information network in the Gulf of Guinea. This will fulfil all the functions of the MTISC GOG (Maritime Trade Information Sharing Centre - Gulf of Guinea), which will close by the end of June, and will further contribute to the Yaoundé process.

INTERCARGO and other industry organisations welcomes this announcement and that France and the UK are to bring their naval expertise to the fight against maritime piracy in the Gulf of Guinea, especially at a time when the safety of the mariner requires more international attention. The technical details are expected in the next two weeks.

 

8 Feb 2016: -

Update on issues about anti-piracy measures

1. Alert! - Recent incidents reported within the territorial waters of Nigeria:
Members may have read reports in the news channels about the incidents of piracy:
• On 6 Feb, there was an attempt of pirates to hijack a container ship operated by A.P. Moeller-Maersk A/S with 25 sailors on board. About this incident some reports indicated that none of the crew members were hurt and all the cargo was intact;
• Tanker Leon Dias was hijacked and freed as reported on 2 Feb, with five crew members being kidnapped.
From the reports in the new channels, both incidents seemed happening within the territorial waters of Nigeria.

2. Information from ICC’ International Maritime Bureau (IMB)
Its annual piracy report indicated:
• IMB’s Piracy Reporting Centre (IMB PRC) recorded 246 incidents in 2015, one more than in 2014. The number of vessels boarded rose 11% to 203, one ship was fired at, and a further 27 attacks were thwarted. Armed with guns or knives, pirates killed one seafarer and injured at least 14.
• Nigeria is a hotspot for violent piracy and armed robbery. Though many attacks are believed to go unrecorded, IMB received reports of 14 incidents, with 9 vessels boarded. In the first of these, ten pirates armed with AK47 rifles boarded and hijacked a tanker and took all nine crewmembers hostage. They then transferred the fuel oil cargo into another vessel, which was taken away by two of the attackers. The Ghanaian navy dispatched a naval vessel to investigate as the tanker moved into its waters, then arrested the pirates on board.
• As per IMB’s report at https://icc-ccs.org/news/1154-imb-maritime-piracy-hotspots-persist-worldwide-despite-reductions-in-key-areas, “no Somali-based attacks were reported in 2015”. IMB warns vessels transiting the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean to stay particularly vigilant.

3. Database at IMO
IMO has a database at https://gisis.imo.org/Public/PAR/Default.aspx. It recorded 3 incidents in 2016 happening in West Africa.
1) IMO also issues circulars on monthly based to update on piracy titled as “REPORTS ON ACTS OF PIRACY AND ARMED ROBBERY AGAINST SHIPS”. A very recent circular was issued on 16 Jan 2016, as attached for your reference (MSC.4-Circ.231). On 2 Dec 2015, IMO issued a circular letter to all IMO Member States, informing the revision to the High Risk Area (HRA) of the Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy (BMP 4). Other information from IMO:
• MSC.1/Circ.1405/Rev.2, issued on 25 May 2012, Revised Interim guidance to shipowners, ship operators and shipmasters on the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the High Risk Area
• MSC.1/Circ.1406/Rev.3, issued on 12 June 2015, Revised Interim recommendations for flag states regarding the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on board ships in the high risk area
• IMO paper “MSC 94-INF.5” by Italy dated 15 August 2014 on- Privately contracted armed security personnel. This document provides the Report of the informal expert working group on guidelines for the use of privately contracted armed security personnel (PCASP) on board ships, held in Rome on 26 March and 15-16 October 2013, under the auspices of the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI)

4. Insurance sector
The Joint War Committee (JWC), a Joint Committee of the LMA and IUA, reviewed on 10 Dec 2015 the Listed Areas (last altered 12th June 2013), and agreed the following changes which are incorporated in the new list as attached (JWLA022 2015-12-10 Indian Ocean.pdf).
Amended:
Indian Ocean / Arabian Sea / Gulf of Aden / Gulf of Oman / Southern Red Sea
Deleted:
Bahrain, NE Borneo, Sulu Archipelago

P&I advice on amended BIMCO GUARDCON contract for the employment of security guards on vessels off West Africa at webpage: http://www.ukpandi.com/knowledge/article/circular-3-14-amended-bimco-guardcon-contract-for-the-employment-of-security-guards-on-vessels-off-west-africa-129986/ . It indicates that GUARDCON does not represent a recommendation or endorsement by BIMCO or the International Group of P&I Clubs for the use of security guards on board vessels.

5. Industry working group
Piracy and Armed Robbery against ships endangers the lives of seafarers and imperils ships, their cargoes, and freedom of navigation. Piracy and Armed Robbery thrives on criminality ashore and impacts on the world economy and the cost of goods. INTERCARGO and its Round Table partners of BIMCO, ICS and INTERTANKO believes it is the responsibility of all coastal states to establish and enforce security in their territorial waters, their EEZ, and on the High Seas.

INTERCARGO has been part of an industry working group on anti-piracy. Regular meetings are held among secretariats of BIMCO, ICS, INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO and OCIMF. Through this WG, close contact has been retained with most of the major forces of Navy, Reporting Centres and regional anti-piracy interests.

It is continuously to highlight that the three pillars of BMP 4 are registering at MSCHOA, reporting to UKMTO and implementing ship protection measures on the basis of a thorough risk assessment remain essential.

The area previously classified as “high risk” now forms only a part of the area called the Voluntary Reporting Area (VRA). Ships entering the VRA must still register with the Maritime Security Centre for the Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) and report to the United Kingdom Marine Trade Operations (UKMTO) to be monitored during transit. Pre-transit risk assessments should take into account the latest information from both the Voluntary Reporting Area and High Risk Area.

The industry associations further emphasised that in view of the continuing high risk of pirate attack, shipping companies must continue to maintain full compliance with the BMP and be vigilant in their voluntary reporting on piracy incidents, sighting of potential pirates, and any suspicious activity – as this provides crucial intelligence on risk levels in the area.

6. Flag States requirements
On 8 Feb 2016, Cyprus posted Guidance for anti-piracy law at http://maritimecyprus.com/2016/02/08/cyprus-guidance-for-anti-piracy-law/ .
More information refers to webpages at:
http://www.ics-shipping.org/docs/default-source/Piracy-Docs/comparison-of-flag-state-laws-on-armed-guards-and-arms-on-board3F9814DED68F.pdf , and
http://www.ukpandi.com/fileadmin/uploads/uk-pi/Documents/Piracy/privatearmedguardsflagstateregs.pdf.

7. Coastal States requirement
West African littoral states prohibit the use of armed PMSCs (private maritime security companies) on vessels in their territorial waters. India is very sensitive about the presence of armed security guards on merchant ships.

8. Useful contacts
• the UKMTO in Dubai is the primary point of contact for liaison with military forces in the region. Email ukmto@eim.ae to join their voluntary reporting scheme, Telephone: +971 50 552 3215, Telex: (51) 210473
• Maritime Security Centre Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) is manned 24/7 by military and merchant navy personnel from various countries and coordinates with military maritime forces in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean. It is the commercial/civilian link with the EU Naval Force Somalia. Telephone: +44 1923 958545, Fax: +44 1923 958 520, email: postmaster@mschoa.org
• The NATO Shipping Centre (NSC) is the commercial/civilian link with the NATO maritime force. Telephone: +44 1923 956 574, Fax: +44 1923 956 575, email: info@shipping.nato.int
• the Maritime Liaison Office (MARLO), US Navy Bahrain, is a secondary point of contact after UKMTO and MSCHOA, but is manned 24/7. Telephone: +973 3940 1395, email: marlo.bahrain@me.navy.mil


9. Incidents of piracy in Asia
• A total of 200 incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships (comprising 187 actual incidents and 13 attempted incidents) were reported to the ReCAAP ISC in 2015. Of these, 11 were acts of piracy and 189 were incidents of armed robbery against ships. Compared to 2014, there has been a 7% increase in total number of incidents in 2015.
• Incidents reported in 2015 has been less severe comparing to 2014; with relatively lesser number of incidents involving more than 9 perpetrators, lesser cases involving perpetrators who were armed; and lesser incidents with reports that crew was threatened, held hostage and assaulted.
• Of the 200 incidents, 60% (120) incidents occurred on board ships while underway, and 40% (80) on board ships while at anchor/berth. More than 50% of the total number of incidents reported in 2015 occurred in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore (SOMS) on board ships while underway. A total of 104 incidents were reported there, of which more than half of them were CAT 4 incidents. However, no actual incident had been reported in the straits since November 2015, probably as a result of an increase in patrolling and surveillance carried out by the littoral States who had also arrested perpetrators responsible for some of the incidents.
• While the situation at most ports and anchorages in Asia has improved in 2015 compared to 2014; Vietnam reported an increase in number of incidents, particularly at the Vung Tau port/anchorage with 60% of the total number of incidents in Vietnam occurred there.
• Incidents involving hijacking of tankers for theft of oil cargo were mostly CAT 1 incidents; and a total of 12 incidents had been reported in 2015, of which two incidents were foiled by the authorities. However, no incidents involving hijacking of tankers had been reported since September 2015. Attributing to this could be the arrests of the masterminds and perpetrators responsible for some of the incidents reported in 2015.
• Continuous zeal among the littoral States and cooperation between the authorities and shipping industry demonstrates the determination and commitment in clamping down this illegal maritime crime. With decline in the number of incidents reported in the last quarter of 2015; and more perpetrators being put to task; more need to be done to bring about further decrease in the number of incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships in Asia.

+++

17 Dec 2015:

The Joint War Committee (JWC) amended the boundaries of the Listed Areas in Indian Ocean / Arabian Sea / Gulf of Aden / Gulf of Oman / Southern Red Sea on 10 Dec 2015 as follows:

The waters enclosed by the following boundaries:
a) On the north-west, by the Red Sea, south of Latitude 15° N
b) on the west of the Gulf of Oman by Longitude 58° E
c) on the east, Longitude 65° E
d) and on the south, Latitude 12° S

Refer to the enclosed pdf file for details.

 

8 Dec 2015: PIRACY – REVISION OF HIGH RISK AREA

Action required: Members are requested to disseminate the attached amendment to the definition of the High Risk Area (HRA) in BMP 4 and supporting guidance as widely and as soon as possible. Feedback and queries with respect to the implementation of the measures should be provided to the undersigned.

Members are aware of discussion at the IMO Marine Safety Committee and the work of the UN Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia (CGCPS) to harmonise the view of littoral states and industry regarding the Indian Ocean HRA. Following an industry review of a threat assessment from military intelligence, we are pleased to advise that the co-sponsors BMP 4 (the 4th version of “Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy”) have agreed to a revised definition of the High Risk Area.

The High Risk Area is now defined as being bounded by:

In the Red Sea:                       Latitude 15oN

In the Gulf of Oman:             Latitude 22oN

Eastern limit:                          Longitude 065oE

Southern limit:                       Latitude 5oS

Annex A to this circular provides an amendment to Section 2 of BMP 4, accompanying guidance on the revision’s impact and practical measures for company and shipboard planning as described in sections 6 and 7 of BMP 4.

The revisions will formally apply from 1 December 2015, in order to give shipping companies and crews’ time to adapt.

It is strongly recommended that the revisions be taken into account for voyages through the VRA (Voluntary Reporting Area) and HRA for which risk assessments are yet to be conducted. Please note these changes may have implications for charter party and insurance agreements as well as ship security arrangements.

It is not anticipated to publish a revised version of BMP 4 to incorporate these changes. It is expected that a new version of the Admiralty Chart Q6099 will be made available before the entry into force of the revisions on 1 December 2015.

Whilst the revision re-designates the area considered to be at a high risk from Somalia-based pirate groups, the threat assessment recognised that these groups retain the ability to attack at the historical limits of their activity. As such, the three pillars of BMP 4, namely registering at MSCHOA (The Maritime Security Centre – Horn of Africa) , reporting to UKMTO (the UK Maritime Trade Operations) and implementing ship protection measures on the basis of a thorough risk assessment remain essential. Any lowering of guard in the region is likely to present an opportunity for a resurgence of pirate activities.

Please refer to the press release below from industry associations today.

Press Release on 8 Oct 2015:

quote

Vigilance still crucial as piracy High Risk Area in the Indian Ocean reduced

Organisations representing the global shipping and oil industry have announced that the size of the ‘High Risk Area’ for piracy in the Indian Ocean has been reduced and issued new advice to merchant ship operators.

This reduction to the High Risk Area is in response to the ongoing containment of pirate attacks in the Indian Ocean, but a group of shipping and oil industry organisations (BIMCO, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO and the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF) stressed that a serious threat remains and that correct reporting and vigilance remains crucial.

The reduction of the High Risk Area takes full account of recent shipping industry experience, and follows extensive consultation with governments through the diplomatic Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia, and military naval forces, including NATO, Combined Maritime Forces and EU NAVFOR, which continue to provide vital protection to shipping.

The new industry advice, which takes effect from 1 December, changes that currently contained in the latest edition of Best Management Practices for Protection against Somali Based Piracy (BMP 4), which is jointly produced by the industry group.    

In summary:

· The area previously classified as “high risk” now forms only a part of the area called the Voluntary Reporting Area (VRA)

· Ships entering the VRA must still register with the Maritime Security Centre for the Horn of Africa (MSCHOA) and report to the United Kingdom Marine Trade Operations (UKMTO) to be monitored during transit;

· Pre-transit risk assessments should take into account the latest information from both the Voluntary Reporting Area and High Risk Area.

The industry associations further emphasised that in view of the continuing high risk of pirate attack, shipping companies must continue to maintain full compliance with the BMP and be vigilant in their voluntary reporting on piracy incidents, sighting of potential pirates, and any suspicious activity – as this provides crucial intelligence on risk levels in the area.

ENDS

Click here to download the amendment to BMP 4.

 

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21 November 2016
Piracy - Member Consultation 03 January 2016
Best Management Practices (BMP)


20141002 : The Round Table of international shipping industry associations has released an updated version of ‘Guidelines for Owners, Operators and Masters for Protection Against Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea Region.’  The Guidelines have been jointly developed by BIMCO, ICS, INTERTANKO and INTERCARGO.

Piracy and armed robbery in the waters off West Africa has become an established criminal activity of very serious concern to the maritime sector. Incidents have recently occurred as far south as Angola and as far north as Sierra Leone.  These attacks have become increasingly violent, often involving firearms, and cases of kidnapping for ransom have also become more common.  The global shipping industry has therefore acted in concert to update its existing Guidelines to take account of what has become a totally unacceptable security situation.

Although the nature of the attacks against shipping in West Africa differs from that of Somalia-based piracy, the basic principles of the Best Management Practices, previously developed by the industry to help protect against piracy in the Indian Ocean, are also applicable.   The Guidelines should therefore be read in conjunction with BMP4, but seek to tailor this to the specifics of the threat in West Africa, providing comprehensive advice on avoiding and deterring criminal acts and armed robbery in the region.

The updated Guidelines also take into account new regional maritime security initiatives in West Africa, in particular the Maritime Trade Information Sharing Centre for the Gulf of Guinea (MTISC GOG), which is now providing a focal point for information on countering piracy and maritime crime in the region.  The Guidelines have therefore been released in conjunction with the launch of the new MTISC GOG website which includes Regional Maritime Security Guidance and MTISC-GOG reporting procedures so as to help ensure a co-ordinated approach amongst ships operating in the Gulf of Guinea.

The revised industry Guidelines are attached below, and can also be downloaded free of charge from the websites of BIMCO, ICS, and INTERTANKO.

Guidelines for the Gulf of Guinea, Updated October 2014

20131121 : The correct registration and reporting by ships transiting the HRA, the GoA and the Somali Basin continues to be an essential element of BMP compliance. Members are reminded that Section 5 of BMP4 clearly lays out the requirements for reporting whilst in these regions.

The latest EUNAVFOR report covers the period October 2012 - October 2013 and suggests that an average of 11.7% of ships transiting the region during this period, did NOT register with MSCHOA. Although not as detailed as their previous BMP non-compliance reporting, the report shows that an average of 1,136 ships from a total of 10,607 transits were not registered. The analysis is attached below.

EUNAVFOR BMP Reporting Analysis October 2012-13

20121221 : Recognising the significantly increased security concerns in the Gulf of Guinea region, the Round Table of International Shipping Associations (BIMCO, ICS, INTERCARGO and INTERTANKO) have developed a set of Interim Guidelines for Owners, Operators and Masters for protection against piracy and armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea region.

Based upon consultations with their respective members, the Interim Guidelines have been produced as a result of the collaborative efforts of the four associations, which in addition, have been supported by the NATO Shipping Centre.

Although standalone in nature, the Interim Guidelines should be read in conjunction with the existing industry guidelines that address the Somalia based piracy problem, Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy (BMP4).

The situation in the Gulf of Guinea region is continually evolving, therefore the Interim Guidelines will be updated when the situation dictates or relevant information becomes availalble from other sources, for example, if a security or reporting centre is establshed locally:

Interim Guidance for the Gulf of Guinea, December 2012

 

20121213 : Each month, Intercargo receives a report from EUNAVFOR which lists ships transiting the wider Gulf of Aden region, that are deemed not to be compliant with the requirements of BMP4. The following analysis has been produced by Intercargo based upon the reports received from EUNAVFOR for the period January-November 2012, and highlights factors such as flag, country of beneficial ownership and age of those ships that are deemed not to be compliant: 

BMP Compliance, Members Interim Report, 13 Dec 2012

The analysis report will be updated with the December information when received.

20111006 : BMP4 has now been officially launched. Supported by Intercargo and all major shipping associations, electronic copies can be downloaded by following the link below. Meanwhile, every Intercargo Member will receive a hard-copy as part of an information pack, shortly. Further copies can be obtained by contacting the Intercargo Secretariat direct, or for bulk orders, please contact the publishers, Witherby Seamanship International (www.witherbyseamanship.com). 

20110816 :  The latest version of Best Management Practices, BMP4 is attached below, and industry Associations are currently working on a co-ordinated release of the publication. Meanwhile, we continue to emphasize the importance that all Masters and Shipping Companies are strongly urged to follow the advice and guidance contained in BMP4:

Industry Best Management Practice Version 4 low res.pdf

20110816 : Intercargo has produced an easy-to-follow document that compares the content of BMP4 to the previous version, BMP3, to enable users to quickly identify the main changes and updates made to the latest version: 

BMP4 comparison document with bmp 3.pdf

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19 February 2017
Details of Piracy Attacks in 2010

Details  of all ships seized linked to Somalia in 2010, together with their types, sizes, dates seized, dates released, Flag, crew and location seized can be found in the document below.

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19 February 2017

Ports and Terminals

Article Title Updated
Terminal reporting - Feedback from members on ship-terminal interface problems

21 Nov. 2016:-

1. Action requested:
Shipowner members are encouraged to forward the encloed Terminal Report (v.5.1) to their bulk carrier fleets and invite their masters to fill and send the completed Report back to INTERCARGO office. The Terminal Report requests feedback of all ship-terminal interface issues.

2. Updated:
Following my email below on 13 Oct 2016, please refer to the enclosed update on:
• “Ship-terminal interface” Issues and problems with 100+ ports/regions, reported by masters of bulk carriers of members’ fleets. The database is expanding, with many thanks to members and their fleets for the contribution.
• “Inadequate port reception facilities” and list of 200+ ports without adequate port reception facilities (PRF) for bulk carriers to discharge HME cargo residues (HME-harmful to the marine environment) and hold washings.

You may find them useful as they briefly summarise key issues, damages, corruption, abuse of trust, lack of adequate PRF in named ports/countries for reference of daily operations. It is expected to be a guide to your ships and prepare them to deal with similar issues when visiting identified ports/terminals.

3. Compliance with MARPOL Annex V:
Since 1 Jan 2013 when the revised MARPOL Annex V bans discharge of cargo residues and hold washing with cargoes considered harmful to the marine environment (HME), bulk carriers carrying such cargoes are faced with difficulties to discharge cargo residues and hold washing to adequate port reception facilities (PRF). Based on the feedback in Terminal Reports, INTERCARGO continues to show the difficulties of bulk carriers to IMO member States and at various of IMO meetings and request for ports and terminals to fulfil their same obligation under IMO convention to establish adequate PRF.

Your voices matter and the joint effort benefits all members.

Update on 14 Oct 2016:-

From Oct 2015, hundreds of reports are reaching INTERCARGO Secretariat from INTERCARGO members’ fleets, reporting issues during the ship-terminal interface period.

INTERCARGO Committees and ITS Secretariat have been putting effort to collect feedback from bulk carriers using the Terminal Reporting Form and raising the concerns to relevant parties for improvement.

Member may recall that during recent years, INTERCARGO has been engaging relevant ports to deal with too high loading/unloading rates to prevent damage to ship structures. Safe transport of Iron ore, nickel ore and DRI have been our priority and INTERCARGO is deeply concerned and continues to raise safety awareness and requests for new legislation at IMO and proper implementation of existing ones. Those issues were all raised through terminal reporting – thanks to members and their fleet for contributing to safety of bulk carriers.

Since 1 Jan 2013 when the revised MARPOL Annex V bans discharge of cargo residues and hold washing with cargoes considered harmful to the marine environment (HME), bulk carriers carrying such cargoes are faced difficulties of lack of adequate port reception facilities. The INTERCARGO submission to IMO “III-3-3-1” and “III-14” registered INTERCARGO concerns, effort and intervention at IMO meetings to deal with the issues.

The following two database files briefly summarise key issues, damages, corruption, abuse of trust, lack of adequate PRF in named ports/countries for members reference. You may find them very much useful to guide your ships and prepare them to deal with similar issues with identified ports/terminals.

• Ship-terminal interface Issues reported by bulk carriers, update on 13 Oct 2016
• Ports without adequate port reception facilities

you may contact info@intercargo.org for the latest version of them.

 

 

Terminal reporting

Issues:

Low level of reporting - It is aware of “available, adequacy and sufficient” issues discussed but not reported. A general lack of awareness of reporting schemes coupled with time constraints on ships crew and acceptance of what is provided without questioning may be the reason for poor reporting frequency.

Measures:

1. Two level scheme where the 1st level is relatively simple to complete and a second level providing greater depth could be beneficial and worth of exploring. Such a 2 level scheme would be based on following:

2 channels of reporting – 1) ship and 2) shore offices

2 steps of collection: 1st step to be simple and straight forward to collect the issue from ship (and shore); 2nd step to be the follow-up or in-depth investigation following the lead of the 1st step reports;

2 platforms to deal with the issues – white list of “good guys” and joint industry action to talk to individual port with negative issues.

Members are urged to engage their fleets and shore offices to provide feedback.

2. Joint effort with other industry associations

INTERCARGO continues its practice and keeps open mind for constructive joint effort with other industry associations such as BIMCO and IBTA, subject to INTERCARGO’s goal and objectives to be fulfilled.

3. With sufficient number of reports from member companies, analysis and statistical information may suggest industry level actions to deal with the reported issued.

ENDS

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19 February 2017
Ports and Terminals Briefing

(Updated on 17 Dec 2015)

Difficulties with lack of adequate reception facilities for HME (harmful for marine environment) cargo residues were raised at the TC meeting on 12 Oct in Athens, with actions agreed:
• To request IMO to re-validate circular MEPC.1/Circ.810 (Adequate port reception facilities for cargoes declared as harmful to the marine environment under MARPOL Annex V, as attached herewith for reference)
• To invite Intercargo members to request their fleets for feedback with the enclosed Reporting Form.

During IMO Assembly in Dec 2015, members’ request was delivered by INTERCARGO statements. To assist IMO and its MEPC in Apr 2016 to look into the difficulties with adequate reception facilities for HME cargo residues, INTERCARGO members and other bulk carrier owners are invited to support and feedback evidence of lack of adequate port reception facilities.

With input from INTERCARGO members, statistics and analysis will be drafted. Such info will be shared with other relevant industry associations for possible cross industry effort to bring the issues jointly to IMO.

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17 December 2015
Ports and Terminals - Latest Developments

(Updated on 17 Dec 2015)

Western Australia ports requiring bulk carriers to berth with hatches open

Intercargo has been receiving some concerning information on what appears to be an increasing practice in some Western Australia ports of requiring bulk carriers to berth with hatches open and cargo starting immediately prior to completing berthing.The information said:

"Dampier and some other West Australian ports follow a procedure of early loading for bulk carriers. Under this procedure a vessel is supposed to berth with 2 holds open and the loading starts as soon as the vessel is in position alongside, being held by tugs but before being all fast".

Realizing that there may be safety concerns during loading without the vessel being properly moored, INTERCARGO made contact with AMSA on 3 Nov 2015 with immediate reply on the same day, indicating that "We have become aware of this and we are in communication with the terminal. We have reiterated that our position is that a vessel must be safely secured (all fast and finished with engines) before loading starts. We are still pursuing this but would appreciate the details if any further communication you may have on the issue".

INTERCARGO and its members appreciate the prompt response from AMSA and their due attention and actions.

 

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17 December 2015
Ports and Terminals - Member Consulatation

Text below is only available to logged in users ("read more")

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02 November 2015

Port State Control

Article Title Updated
Port State Control, Transparency & Related Issued by Tokyo MoU Secretariat

INTERCARGO members and guests had the opportunity to attend a very interesting presentation by the Tokyo MOU Secretariat delivered by Mr Wai-hok LEUNG, Senior Surveyor of Ships, Port State Control Section for Director of Marine, Marine Department, Hong Kong, China.


The presentation was delivered in the context of the INTERCARGO meetings in Hong Kong on 6-7 March 2017 (see relevant article here) during the Presentations afternoon session on the second day.


Members please login to access the full presentation attached.

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10 March 2017
Port State Control - Case of mis-conduct ? Eco Inspection in Ukraine

Port State Control - Case of misconduct – Eco Inspection in Ukraine

In Sept 2015, there were 2 cases when ecological inspectors made photos of sea surface around the ship, allegedly contaminated by oil. They put the above pictures on local internet page and started to produce a ‘great noise’ about potential ecological damage. They undertook these actions with purpose to get access to check-up and making analyses of segregated ballast of the vessel.

Place: Dneprobugsky port, Nikolaev Region of Ukraine

Ports like Odessa, Yuzhny and Ilyichevsk are practically free now from ‘ecological racket’. Some other Ukrainian ports ecological inspectors try to get access to the sampling of the segregated ballast by means of various fraudulent actions.

For details of the case, refer to the pdf file.

Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

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19 February 2017
Port State Control Performance and Analysis Briefing

Issue Summary

INTERCARGO supports accurate measurement of quality, the promotion of quality and the eradication of sub-standard shipping. INTERCARGO works with PSC interests to support :-

  • Harmonised standards and training of inspectors
  • Consistent interpretation on what constitutes clear grounds for inspection
  • The raising of standards of all MoUs to those of the global best.

 Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

INTERCARGO Policy

The function of port State control is to ensure that shipping conforms to the regulatory requirements of internationally agreed Conventions.   Of the 9 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) areas plus the US Coast Guard, almost all have publicly accessible targeting matrices, selecting vessels based on empirically defined risks associated with owners past performance, vessel type, flag, age, Classification Society etc.  In the overwhelming majority of cases, targeting and inspection is professionally undertaken leading to a safer and more environmentally friendly Industry.

INTERCARGO fully supports the enforcement of regulation through the PSC process. By making detailed information available to the PSC authorities and all other interested parties through our annual “Benchmarking” Report, INTERCARGO provides a transparent and statistically verifiable statement on the performance of various stakeholders including ships entered by INTERCARGO members, thereby encouraging continuous improvement. The strategic aim of INTERCARGO is therefore to "support the MoU policies of rewarding (through fewer inspections) the owners and operators of vessels that perform highly during PSC inspections and to target/improve the below average stakeholders".

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12 January 2017
Terminal Operational Damage

Issue Summary

There are some reports of dry bulk vessels abeing damaged through specific operational practices at certain terminals.

INTERCARGO Policy

Although a comparatively rare phenomena, INTERCARGO believes that owners should be aware of the effects of harsh terminal operations on the structural integrity of the ship and should take whatever steps are necessary – including the use of appropriate Charterparty Clauses, to create an improved operational environment in the ship-port interface.

Summary of Recent Developments

For many years, INTERCARGO has encouraged its members to complete a Terminal Report Form, outlining allegations of stevedore damage.

Interest in completing and returning such forms to INTERCARGO has waned considerably in recent years and in recognition of this fact, INTERCARGO switched over to a system whereby Masters were encouraged to return such forms only in cases where some negative or exceptional issue had been encountered.  From the forms that have been returned to INTERCARGO in the last 1-2 years, only a very tiny minority – less than 2%, showed any reported ship damage through stevedore action and although information was incomplete, there appeared to be no cases where the damage and compensation was not effectively resolved before the ship left the terminal.

Using other industry data, the following terminal or cargo issues were reported in 2008 although it can be assumed that the figures given show an under-reporting of the true numbers of cases.

Issues connected with the cargo crane of the ship – 4
Cargo quality / contamination of the ship through dust – 2
Stevedore damage – 3
Deck cargo lost (logger) - 1

Stevedore damage invariable involved the loading or discharge of scrap or steel cargoes.

However, the issue of concern raised by INTERCARGO members concerned the inadequacy of fendering at a very limited number of terminals where cargoes are effectively transhipped using crane barges or other fixed transhipment systems.  Without proper and adequate fendering systems, a rubbing motion caused by tidal movement can cause damage to the Bulk Carrier.


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19 February 2017
Updates on PSC issues

8 Jun 2016: -

The Report of the CIC on Crew Familiarisation on Enclosed Space Entry, carried out jointly by Paris MoU and Tokyo MoU members in September to November of 2015 can be downloaded here. The PSC regimes will continue to pay attention to the correct execution of enclosed space entry drills as 7.9% of drills were found to be unsatisfactory found during the CIC.

Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

Click here to download the ABS publication:
GUIDANCE FOR REDUCING PORT STATE DETENTIONS - PRE-PORT ARRIVAL QUICK REFERENCE

Click here to download the DNV GL publication:
Port State Control Quick Guide with most common detainable items

Click here to download:
Results of the 2014 Paris and Tokyo MoUs Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on STCW hours of rest Submitted by the Paris and Tokyo MoUs SUMMARY Executive summary, dated 6 Apr 2016 

Click here to download:

Flag Administrations targeted by the United States Coast Guard, the Paris MoU and the Tokyo MoU Submitted by the United States, the Paris MoU and the Tokyo MoU SUMMARY Executive summary, dated 6 Apr 2016

 

1 Mar 2016:- Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) - Latest Developments

Concentrated Inspection Campaign on Crew Familiarization for Enclosed Space Entry in Paris MoU has raised awareness

PSCO’s in the Tokyo MoU and Paris MoU regions have performed a joint Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on Crew Familiarization for Enclosed Space Entry from 1 September through 30 November 2015.

In general the results of the CIC indicate that the subject of Enclosed Space Entry is taken seriously by the industry. The CIC did not lead to an increase in the rate of detentions however the actual compliance, shown in drills, could be better. 7.9% of drills were found to be unsatisfactory.

Preliminary results on Enclosed Space Entry for the Paris MoU show that 3776 inspections have been performed using the CIC questionnaire. Of those inspections 54 detentions have CIC topic related deficiencies. The total number of detentions in the 3-month period was 160.

The detention percentage for the CIC period is similar to the average annual percentage. A satisfactory level of compliance was shown and the time invested was well spent to raise awareness of enclosed space entry procedures and check compliance on an important topic where lives can be at stake.

Further analysis will be done on the inspection results to see whether there are any recommendations that could be made to industry, flag States or MoUs. Results of the detailed analysis will be discussed at the annual Committee meeting in May 2016 and the Committee will decide whether or not to publish the results of the CIC.

(Source: Press release of Paris MOU, 22 Feb 2016)

 

21 Dec 2015: -

Port State Control Performance and Analysis of bulk carriers in 2014

With reference to the enclosed PSC Annual Reports in 2014, summary of PSC performance of bulk carrier in 2014 was made as follows:

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12 January 2017
PSC Regional Round-Up 2013 Publications

Regional Round-Up 2013 : Ports Where Bulk Carriers Were Detained

In order to provide its members with the most up to date industry information in an effort to improve fleet performance, Intercargo has produced a series of four unique new publications that contain a host of bulk carrier specific PSC data, relating to dry bulk vessels over 10,000Dwt trading internationally.

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19 February 2017
New Inspection Regime from Paris MoU

Intercargo and Intertanko recently hosted representatives of the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) who delivered a presentation on the requirements of the New Inspection Regime (NIR) of the Paris MoU on Port State Control, due to enter into force on 1st January 2011.?

Summary

On 1st January 2011, there will be changes to the reporting and targeting regimes for ships calling at ports under the Paris MoU jurisdiction. Details of the new reporting requirements may be found in the EMSA leaflet below. Please note that in accordance with reporting and other requirements, individual member states will remain responsible for implementing the rules on pre-arrival reporting both 72 and 24 hours in advance, noting that the 72 hour period will apply to vessels which are deemed eligible for an Expanded Inspection. The NIR will now also take account of the historical performance of a company when assessing whether a ship is subject to an inspection. If a vessel is deemed a low risk ship, the number of inspections in Paris MoU ports might be as few as one in every 24-36 month period.

For further information please see below.

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19 February 2017
Port State Control Performance and Analysis - Member Consultation

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Members views, comments and proposals are welcome to reach Intercargo Secretariat via email info@intercargo.org.

Please click here and use the INTERCARGO Reporting Form to report problems and concerns.

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12 January 2017

Reception facilities & MARPOL Annex V

Article Title Updated
HME Cargo Charter Party Clause

 

Members please login to read.

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05 April 2017
Reception Facilities & MARPOL Annex V - Latest Developments

12 Feb 2016:-

INTERCARGO et al jointly submitted a paper to IMO, proposing a draft MEPC circular addressing concerns about the availability of Port Reception Facilities (PRF) to receive cargo hold washwater containing solid bulk cargo residues deemed harmful to the Marine Environment. Click here to download the paper "MEPC 69-11-2 - Draft MEPC circular on the provision of port reception facilities for cargoes declared as... ( Marshall Islands, INTERCARGO...)."

The paper suggests that enforcement of MARPOL V would be enhanced by recognising that the provision of appropriate facilities to receive potentially considerable quantities of hold washing water may be inadequately described in the GISIS entry for some ports and terminals. Furthermore, it is suggested that an alignment of the 2012 Guidelines for the implementation of MARPOL Annex V (resolution MEPC. 219(63) as amended and promulgated through the 2017 Edition of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC Code) would encourage the provision of appropriate PRF with appropriate environmental concerns addressed through the retention of safeguards promoted in MEPC.1/Circ.810.

12 Feb 2016:-
Based on Member's recent feedback on port reception facilities and problems faced during ship’s stay in some ports, the enclosed "Progress update of INTERCARGO Terminal Reporting and difficulties with HME residue reception facilities" is a summary of recent reports for reference.

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05 April 2017
Cargo residues, washing water and port reception facilities

Members please login to read.

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05 April 2017
General guidance on shippers declaration on cargoes HME properties

draft v.1.1, Dec 2015

In accordance with MARPOL Annex V, the management of the residues of solid bulk cargoes depends primarily on the classification of a solid bulk cargo as to whether it is harmful to the marine environment (HME) or non-HME.

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05 April 2017
Reception Facilities & MARPOL Annex V Briefing

(Updated on 17 Dec 2015)

Port reception facilities

IMO develops and maintains a port reception facility database (PRFD) as a module of the IMO Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) . The PRFD was designed to allow IMO Member States to update the Database via a log-in password, and to allow the public to access all the information in the Database on a view-only basis. Click here to get access to GISIS.

Revised MARPOL Annex V

In July 2011, MEPC 62 adopted the revised MARPOL Annex V which entered into force on 1 January 2013. Click here for the full text of the revised MARPOL Annex V.

In March 2012, MEPC 63 adopted the 2012 Guidelines for the implementation of MARPOL Annex V (click here for full text) and the 2012 Guidelines for the development of garbage management plans (click here for full text).

Compliance with MARPOL Annex V

The effectiveness of ships to comply with the discharge requirements of MARPOL depends largely upon the availability of adequate port reception facilities, especially within special areas. MARPOL obliges Governments to ensure the provision of adequate reception facilities at ports and terminals for the reception of garbage without causing undue delay to ships, and according to the needs of the ships using them.

An overview of the revised MARPOL Annex V discharge provisions can be accessed here. Exceptions with respect to the safety of a ship and those on board and accidental loss are contained in regulation 7 of Annex V.

Solid bulk cargoes should be classified and declared by the shipper as to whether or not they are harmful to the marine environment, in accordance with the criteria set out in paragraph 3.2 of the 2012 Guidelines for the Implementation of MARPOL Annex V. Click here to refer to the INTERCARGO General guidance on shippers declaration on cargoes HME properties (14 Dec 2015).

Click here for a simplified overview of the regulations regarding the discharge of cargo residues under the revised Annex V.

Cargo residues

Under MARPOL Annex V, cargo residues are defined as the remnants of any cargo which remain on deck or in holds following loading or unloading. They include loading and unloading excess or spillage, whether in wet or dry condition or entrained in wash water, but do not include cargo dust remaining on deck after sweeping or dust on the external surfaces of the ship (regulation 1.2 of the revised Annex V). In addition to this definition, the revised Annex V also stipulates that only those cargo residues that cannot be recovered using commonly available methods for unloading shall be considered for discharge.

Special Areas under MARPOL

Click here to refer to Special Areas under MARPOL.

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17 December 2015
Round Table Discussion Paper on Port Reception Facilities

Members please login to read.

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05 April 2017
Reception Facilities & MARPOL Annex V - Member Consultation

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Members views, comments and proposals are welcome to reach Intercargo Secretariat via email info@intercargo.org.

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05 April 2017

Training and Manpower

Article Title Updated
Compliance with STCW Convention and MLC

7 Dec 2016:-

STCW Convention: International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers. Click here for details from the IMO webpage.

MLC: Maritime Labour Convention, 2006. Click here for details from the ILO webpage.

1. Compliance with the 2010 Manila Amendments to STCW Convention by 1 Jan 2017 – related to PSC inspection and ISM audit

IMO recognized that: some seafarers on board ships may not yet hold their certificates or flag State endorsements, meeting the 2010 Manila Amendments to STCW Convention.

In order to assist shipping companies and their fleet in dealing with PSC inspection and ISM audit, IMO just issued a circular “MSC.1/Circ.1560” dated 5 Dec 2016 enclosed herewith, to urge port State control authorities to take the above factors into consideration when taking action under the control.

It is IMO’s position that:

• in cases where a seafarer's documentation complied with the requirements in force immediately before 1 January 2017, but was not in accordance with the requirements of the 2010 Manila Amendments to the STCW Convention, all port State control authorities, until 1 July 2017, have been recommended by this circular to take a pragmatic and practical approach during inspections and to notify the ships, seafarers and Administrations concerned accordingly.
• For Class and other ROs of the flag Administrations, the Administrations should inform them when issuing ISM Code certification under SOLAS 74 that, until 1 July 2017, if a seafarer's documentation was not in accordance with the 2010 Manila Amendments to the STCW Convention, those ROs should understand that it would be sufficient to inform the Administration when assessing compliance with the provisions of the ISM Code.

2. Compliance with the amendments to MLC (Maritime Labour Convention) by 18 Jan 2017

Members may recall that my “IC1636 - A few crew related issues” on 13 Jul 2016 and its follow-up emails advised members that by 18 Jan 2017, evidence of compliance is required to be carried onboard.

For some details of flag State requirements, please refer to the enclosed circulars from Singapore and Panama on this matter.
We have not got any feedback from ships with P&I insurance from non IG member P&I Clubs (http://www.igpandi.org/group-clubs) and if your ships are all under cover by one of IG member P&I Clubs, it should be convenient to get the evidence of compliance. Please refer to the enclosed “IG circular on amendment to MLC2006 MemberCircular_11_2016.pdf” for guidance.

Action requested from INTERCARGO members: feedback, difficulties and comments are invited for us to seek assistance to resolve your difficulties from relevant authorities.

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07 December 2016
Reports of fraudulent certificates

IMO made a report with reference of "HTW 3/4" on 30 November 2015, providing a summary of reports on fraudulent certificates received from Belize, Honduras, Singapore, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines for the years 2014 and 2015.

Refer to the enclosed pdf file for details of the report.

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19 February 2017
Day of the Seafarer

Intercargo proudly supports the Day of the Seafarer campaign organised by the IMO.

For further information click on the following link:

http://www.imo.org/About/Events/dayoftheseafarer/Pages/default.aspx

 

 

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19 February 2017
Training, Manpower and Human Element Briefing

Issue Summary

INTERCARGO is concerned about the numbers of seafarers that may be available to meet the future needs of an expanding bulk carrier fleet and where these professionals might be sourced from. In addition the adequacy of the existing training regime for the modern safety conscious bulk carrier sector is being considered.

INTERCARGO Policy

INTERCARGO believes that it will be necessary to give far more attention to the quantum and quality of seafarers’ training if the future Bulk Carrier fleet is to be efficiently manned and accidents reduced.

INTERCARGO has commenced the formation of a Training and Manpower Correspondence Group to consider policy with regard to:

  • issues connected with the supply and demand of seafarers for the expanding Bulk Carrier fleet,
  • competency issues vis-à-vis the established STCW Training Regime and
  • issues connected with the human element and how this interacts with Casualties and other Negative Performance Indicators noted in INTERCARGO’s Benchmarking Report.
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09 November 2016
Training, Manpower and Human Element - Latest Developments

12 July 2016:-

Some crew related issues are highlighted below with actions suggested for Member's reference. Comments are invited and if you have any other crew issues requiring follow-up from my office, please let us know and we would be pleased to do so.

First of all, congratulations to Captain Radhika Menon - an Indian tanker captain, who is to receive 2016 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea as decided at the IMO Council meeting earlier in Jul 2016 (http://www.imo.org/en/MediaCentre/PressBriefings/Pages/21-Bravery-Award-2016.aspx). The Awards ceremony is expected to take place at IMO Headquarters, on 21 November, at the end of the first day of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC).

1. New P&I cover to comply with the amended MLC2006 before 18 Jan 2017

Background
The amendments to MLC 2006 will enter into force on 18 Jan 2017. Ships are required to have certificates on board issued by an insurer (P&I Clubs) confirming that insurance is in place for the cost and expense of crew repatriation, and up to four months contractually entitled arrears of wages and entitlements following abandonment (MLC Regulation 2.5.2, as amended). A further certificate will be required for liabilities for contractual claims arising from seafarer personal injury, disability or death (MLC Standard A4.2, as amended). In order to assist owners in complying with these additional financial security requirements, all 13 International Group (IG) P&I Clubs currently propose to provide the necessary MLC certification by way of an extension clause to the P&I rules, and indemnify the seafarers directly, should the requisite MLC event occur, but with a right of indemnity from Members and on the basis that these new MLC liabilities will not fall within the IG’s existing pooling arrangements.

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09 November 2016
Training, Manpower and Human Element - Member Consulatation

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09 November 2016
INTERCARGO guidance on ECDIS

12 July 2016: -

Appreciations to AMSA for providing following guidance on manual plotting interval on ships using ECDIS as primary means of navigation:

• no mandatory requirement for manual plotting of LOP unless the ECDIS is operating in DR Mode;
• ECDIS must have the capability for ships navigating officers to manually plot the ships position using manually obtained bearing and distance LOP’s;
• ships navigating officers must have full knowledge of the operation of the ECDIS which logically includes the ability to use LOP to plot the ships position;
• verify the ships position displayed on the ECDIS against manually obtained position data (bearing and distance from fixed points/markers, sights from celestial bodies etc.) - Simply looking at the co-ordinates on two separate GPS displays does not achieve this as both units are subject to the inherent limitations/inaccuracies of satellite based position fixing systems;
• Ships navigating officers may verify the ships position on the ECDIS and there is no requirement that this be in the form of a LOP plotted on the ECDIS;
• AMSA Inspectors will:

o look to confirm that the ships position has been verified and this has been recorded somewhere;
o expect the ships SMS to provide guidance on how this is to be done, at what frequency it is to be done and where this is to be recorded;
o ask navigating officers to demonstrate plotting a manual position on the ECDIS to gain confidence in the officer’s familiarity with the equipment fitted and the correct functioning of the equipment.

 

5 July 2016:-

In reply to the questions from INTERCARGO:
“normally ECDIS is shown as primary means of navigation in form E of Safety equipment certificate. Is that not enough to satisfy AMSA requirements? How does AMSA want this matter to be addressed in vessel’s SMS?”

AMSA positively and timely provided clarification as follows:

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09 November 2016

Other issues

Article Title Updated
HATCH COVERS: UK P&I Club new Risk Focus

Please follow this link.

 

 

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15 May 2017
Coatings - Anti-fouling technology

During the Association's Technical Committee meeting in Hong Kong on the 6th March 2017, Paul Cain of Chugoku Paints delivered a presentation on a new aniti-fouling technology, please click here. (member login required)

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29 March 2017
Bulk carries invoiced for Environmental Monitoring System User fee by the Province of Zambales

Background:

In 2015, similar complaints were presented to INTERCARGO and other shipping associations. At that time, it was reported that companies with ships on innocent passage close to the Province of Zambales in the Philippines had received invoices for an environmental charge. The ships concerned had made no port call in the region. With assistance of the Filipino Shipowners’ Association, the issue was brought to the attention of Congressman Manalo. The point was made that UNCLOS Art 26.1 makes it clear that no charge can be levied on foreign ships by reason of their passage through territorial seas and that therefore the action was viewed as a contravention of international law. Congressman Manalo supported the view expressed by shipping and added the matter to the Congressional agenda where a debate took place resulting in the Philippines congress agreeing that the charges should not be applied. Shipowners were advised not to pay the invoices as the matter was being addressed.

Development since Feb 2017:

INTERCARGO members received invoices since Feb 2017 from the Province of Zambales, the Philippines, charging their vessels at USD0.0179 per GT for Provincial Coast Watch Environmental Monitoring System User fee in the province of Zambales, Philippines for their managed vessels' passing the territorial waters.

INTERCARGO advises members to not pay the invoices.

Complaint processes in progress:

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15 March 2017
Ship to ship transfer cargo operations

22 Feb 2017:-

It is recognised that ship to ship (STS) transfer cargo operations are not popular with bulk carriers. Occasionally there were reports but mainly on claim of damages to the ship hull – of ship safety nature. With the implementation of mandatory requirements of MARPOL Annex V – garbage management, it could be of compliance concerns with environmental requirements.

Of the commercial aspect, it is understood that there are a BIMCO new ship-to-ship transfer clause for dry bulk cargo issued in Jan 2015 and some ‘double banking’ clause with ship chartering document.

Responding to a request of 14 Feb 2017 for feewe will keep this project open and feedback/comments invited. Re-assessment and decide in future the necessary course of action when more issues arise concerning safety of people and ship working on STS adback from INTERCARGO members, following items are highlighted:

With many thanks to those members providing comments and guidance, please refer to the following short summary of the feedback:

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22 February 2017
"Cybersecurity for shipping - preparing for a digital world"

The first 2017 session of lNTERCARGO lunchtime presentations successfully took place at our London office on 17 Feb. Many thanks to our Associate Member DNV GL for delivering two presentations, one of which on the topic of:

• "Cybersecurity for shipping - preparing for a digital world"

For more details follow the link here.

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19 February 2017
Zika virus

27 Jul 2016:

With many thanks to our member Videotel for their new safety and training video about the Zika virus, you are invited to circulate following webpage link across your offices for free access to the video and a workbook:
http://landing.kvh.com/zikasafety

Videotel’s video “Zika Virus – Staying Safe” is a 13-minute training video produced by VideotelTM , and
• includes information about the nature and dangers of the Zika virus, how to avoid becoming infected and help prevent its spread, and the role of a pest management plan on vessels to avoid passive transportation of virus-infected mosquitoes on ships, and
• increases awareness of the vitally important prevention measures that can keep seafarers and their colleagues and families safe.

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27 July 2016
Bulk Carrier Ventilation

Moisture damage is the source of a significant number of cargo claims.

Claimants allege that this is brought about by the ship’s failure to ventilate correctly, resulting in the development of condensation (known as “sweat”). This sweat can lead to the deterioration of a number of bulk cargoes such as grain, seedcake and steel surfaces.

All modern bulk carriers are fitted with some form of ventilation, either natural or mechanical, which can be used to minimise the formation of sweat.

Refer to the enclosed publication, with appreciations to the London P&I Club.

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26 February 2016
Deck crane inspections and maintenance

Deck cranes are an important item of ship’s equipment, and when they break down this can result in loss of hire claims. Furthermore, failure of a deck crane can result in serious injury or death.

Depending on the trade of the ship, the cranes may be used in every port or they may be used infrequently. However frequently they are used, they require regular inspection and maintenance.

It is when a problem occurs with a crane that the maintenance records come under scrutiny. It is therefore important that in addition to having a planned maintenance system and carrying out the maintenance, it is properly recorded.

Refer to the enclosed publication, with appreciations to the London P&I Club.

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26 February 2016
Places of Refuge

(29 Jan 2016)

A government obligation to provide places of refuge (PoR) for ships in distress has been a recent topic generally discussed in the media.

There have been a number of instances where ships in need of assistance have been denied prompt access to places of refuge. Those include:
• STOLT VALOR (2012)
• MSC FLAMINIA (2012)
• MARITIME MAISIE (2014)

For summaries about those incidents refer to the enclosed “Cases of Places of Refuge”. Although those denials have not included any bulk carriers, this important issue remains to be resolved satisfactorily.

This circular briefly reports to you the recent relevant framework and strategies at IMO, EU and industry levels:

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29 January 2016
Draft Guidelines for simulated launching for free fall lifeboat

3 Feb 2017:-

It is to advises INTERCARGO members of recent development made by INTERCARGO and its industry association partners together with some flag States, emphasizing industry concerns with lifeboat drills on board.

The industry paper "SSE 4/4" (click here to download) was submitted on 27 Jan 2017 to IMO’s Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE), highlighting that:
• Abandon ship drills, in accordance with SOLAS regulation III/19, are focused on the provision of knowledge and understanding to seafarers in relation to the procedures to launch a lifeboat.
• Testing of lifeboats and associated mechanisms in accordance with SOLAS regulation III/20 is conducted with the purpose of ensuring that the equipment is in working order and is ready for immediate use.
• As described above, drills and testing are separate activities. Consequently, they should be performed separately in order to reinforce the existing safety barriers and to reduce the risk of serious injury or death.
• Drills conducted in compliance with SOLAS regulation III/19 and the draft Guidelines for simulated launching of free-fall lifeboats should avoid the physical activation of the release mechanism in order to avoid exposing the crew to the risk of accidental release of the lifeboat.
The next IMO meeting (SSE 4) receiving above industry input will be held on 20-24 Mar 2017.

Actions requested:
1) Members are requested to bring the industry view and the the industry paper SSE 4/4 to the attention of their Government and invite support to the industry paper from their delegation as Member State of IMO attending SSE 4.
2) Members are invited to share with us experiences, problems and difficulties of your fleet with lifeboat drills on board, in order for INTERCARGO to raise these safety issues concerning members at SSE 4. (contact point of INTERCARGO info@intercargo.org)

21 Nov 2016:-

1. Outcome of the meeting of the Industry Lifeboat Group (ILG)

The outcome of the meeting of the Industry Lifeboat Group (ILG), with INTERCARGO as a member, on 7 Oct 2016 is summarised as follows:
ILG considered an appropriate approach to presentation of the ILG submissions to MSC 97 (MSC 97/19/4 & MSC 97/INF.3 as enclosed). When these submissions are introduced at MSC 97, following points will be highlighted (paras 10 & 11 of MSC 97/19/4):
• The ILG considers that the current definition and requirement for "simulated launching", which includes activation of the release mechanism while the lifeboat remains restrained at or close to the stowed position, should be amended to ensure that during mandatory drills the release mechanism is not activated. The proposed amendment will provide an additional level of risk control during drills by avoiding activation of the release mechanism that, either through design deficiencies, insufficient or incorrect maintenance or a failure to appropriately follow procedures, has been shown to be a central factor in numerous accidents.
• At its next session of IMO SSE Sub-Committee, when conducting a detailed review of the draft MSC circular on Guidelines on safety during abandon ship drills using lifeboats and the draft amendments to MSC.1/Circ.1205, it shall include consideration of industry developed draft amendments to the Guidelines
The existing definition of "simulated launching" in the Appendix of Annex 2 of MSC.1/Circ.1206/Rev.1 is quoted as follows:
• Definition: Simulated launching is a means of training the crew in the free-fall release procedure of free-fall lifeboats and in verifying the satisfactory function of the free-fall release system without allowing the lifeboat to fall into the sea.
Progress report will be circulated on this matter after the relevant IMO meetings.

2. Ensuring safety during lifeboat drills

Thanks to UK P&I Club for posting “Ensuring safety during lifeboat drills” at webpage http://www.ukpandi.com/knowledge/article/ensuring-safety-during-lifeboat-drills-135922/ . It draws following lessons learned from the prior incidents:
• The entire crew should be capable of operating lifeboat systems and understanding the mechanics and procedures even with minimum training or experience.
• Communication between the crew during drills must be clear, with confirmed completion of each step throughout the exercise.
• When the design of the lifeboat launch system and its components are complicated, Members should consistently train on the operation, repair and maintenance of the entire lifeboat system. If necessary, require that the manufacturer supply easy to understand instructions and diagrams to explain the proper operation or create a common operating procedure safety manual independent of the manufacturer instructions.
I found the attached “Lifeboat Bow Tie diagram” from the above webpage quite useful:
• Hazard, threats and consequences: In the centre of the diagram, Hazardous Activities is identified as the ‘hazard’, while blue squares to the left identify a range of ‘threats’, which, if not controlled, could cause a serious incident involving P&I claims and other consequences which can be seen in the red shape on the far right of the diagram.
• Controls: Between these extremities can be seen the ‘controls’ which, if they work properly, will prevent the accident happening and on the right hand side of the diagram, controls which will mitigate the consequences.
Thus taking as an example the threat of Lifeboat Launching (left hand side), controls which should be in place to prevent this include machinery guards, inspection and planned maintenance, lifeboat release hook testing, good system maintenance and for exercises to be conducted in calm conditions.
• Consequences: The consequences of an accident (right hand side) will be mitigated by the capability of the crew to deal with an incident, good record keeping, emergency reporting and communication procedures, systems and procedures to maintain steering, emergency drills, clear abort procedures and recovery measures implemented by well-trained crew.

15 Dec 2015:-

INTERCARGO is a member of the joint industry working group on lifeboat (ILG). As outcome of the ILG, a set of draft Guidelines for simulated launching for free fall lifeboat is available for review and comments. One of the objectives of ILG Guidelines is to seek amendment to the PSC Guidelines that are to be considered by the III Sub-Committee in July 2016. In due time industry associations including INTERCARGO will submit the Guidelines to IMO for consideration.

The enclosed pdf document is a clean version of the draft, review and comment is invited from INTERCARGO members and other bulk carrier shipowners.

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03 February 2017
Round Table Discussion Paper on Places of Refuge

The provision of a place of refuge for a ship in need of assistance is critical to mitigate the serious safety and environmental that refusal of such a place may otherwise create. However, there have been a number of recent instances where ships in need of assistance were denied prompt access to places of refuge including:

  • STOLT VALOR (2012)
  • FLAMINIA (2012)
  • MARITIME MAISIE (2014)

(refer to the enclosed pdf file for the full text of the Round Table Discussion Paper on Places of Refuge)

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15 December 2015
Analysis of Emergency Evacuation from Bulk Carriers 12 July 2012
Anchoring, Towing, and Mooring Requirements

Intercargo has agreed to participate in the IACS JWG for the Comprehensive Review of Anchoring, Towing, and Mooring Requirements

A summary of the terms of reference of this group can be seen below.

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08 April 2011
Asian Gypsy Moth
Please see below information from the USDA with regard to the Asian Gypsy Moth.
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14 August 2012
Pilotage

Pilot Transfer Arrangements

The International Maritime Pilots’ Association (IMPA) jointly with the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Shipping Federation (ISF) have produced a shipping industry guidance document entitled Pilot Transfer Arrangements.

The new Guide, designed to help ensure compliance with SOLAS requirements, is aimed at shipping companies and seafarers and gives practical information on rigging, safe use and condition of pilot transfer ladders and associated equipment.

The Guide is also supported by a number of other industry associations including INTERCARGO.

The Guide can be found here : Industry pilot transfer guide.pdf

 

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21 June 2015
Bulk Carrier Definition

Issue Summary

This issue essentially concerns the definition of an exemption to the all encompassing definition “intended primarily to carry dry cargo in bulk”. Traditional bulk carriers, with hopper and topside tanks, are not at issue and have a clear definition in the CSR rules and in parts of SOLAS. However, some vessel, such as multipurpose or general cargo ships, occasionally carry dry cargo in bulk and it is argued that they should not have to comply with all of the bulk carrier requirements.

INTERCARGO Policy

INTERCARGO’s position is that:

(i) If a ship is primarily designed to carry dry cargoes in bulk, that is, it is designed in the first instance around dry bulk cargoes, then it should be designated a bulk carrier and comply with the pertinent requirements of SOLAS including chapter XII.

(ii) When a ship is primarily designed to carry other cargoes, for example designed around containers and break bulk, and only occasionally carries dry bulk cargo then it is not appropriate to use the bulk carrier designation. However, any additional risks associated with the carriage of dry bulk cargoes in such a ship should be identified and appropriately regulated.

Summary of Recent Developments

MSC 85, meeting in November/December 2008, adopted a resolution (MSC 277 (85)) on the clarification of the term “bulk carrier”; and guidance for application of regulations to new ships which occasionally carry dry cargos in bulk and are not determined bulk carriers under SOLAS (in reg. XII/1.1 and Ch II-1). It should be noted that this resolution does not change SOLAS, but provides guidance on how to apply relevant SOLAS requirements. While a resolution cannot provide mandatory application dates, governments are urged to apply the guidance to new ships built (keel laid) on or after 1 July 2010.

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17 July 2012
Lifeboats

Outcome of MSC 97, Nov 2016

The 97th session of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 97), held from 21 to 25 Nov 2016, considered documents MSC 97/19/4 and MSC 97/INF.3 (INTERCARGO et al.), related to the work of SSE 4 to be held in Mar 2017 and agreed to instruct SSE 4, when conducting a detailed review of the draft MSC circular on Guidelines on safety during abandon ship drills using lifeboats and the Guidelines for developing operation and maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems (MSC.1/Circ.1205) in order to capture possible inconsistencies emanating from the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear (resolution MSC.402(96)), to include consideration of industry developed draft amendments to these guidelines.

Outcome of IMO MSC 96, May 2016

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08 February 2017
Navigation

Pilot Transfer Arrangements

20120905 : The International Maritime Pilots’ Association (IMPA) jointly with the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Shipping Federation (ISF) have produced a shipping industry guidance document entitled Pilot Transfer Arrangements.

The new Guide, designed to help ensure compliance with SOLAS requirements, is aimed at shipping companies and seafarers and gives practical information on rigging, safe use and condition of pilot transfer ladders and associated equipment.

The Guide is also supported by a number of other industry associations including INTERCARGO.

The Guide can be found here : Industry Pilot Transfer Guide

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06 September 2012
Panama Canal

Update, 13 June 2016:-

1. The expanded Panama Canal will be formally opened on 26 Jun 2016.

• As per its Advisory No. A-30-2016, dated May 31, 2016, beginning June 27, 2016, the maximum allowable draft for vessels transiting the new locks will be 13.11 m (43.0 feet) Tropical Fresh Water (TFW) (https://pancanal.com/common/maritime/advisories/2016/a-30-2016.pdf ).
• Long term, the new lock dimensions will be able to accommodate an 180,000-185,000 dwt Capesize, but only if it is in ballast or partially loaded with 120,000-130,000 metric tonnes of cargo, given the maximum canal draught of 15.2 m.

2. Panama Canal Safe Boarding Week 4-8 July 2016

• The ACP Advisory (https://pancanal.com/common/maritime/advisories/2016/a-31-2016.pdf and check list at https://pancanal.com/common/maritime/advisories/2016/a-31-2016-chklist.pdf) stating that:
• Safe Boarding Week will be observed on 4-8 July 2016, emphasizing and encouraging safe boarding practices on vessels transiting the Canal.
• Vessels at both Cristobal and Balboa anchorages will be boarded to inspect their boarding facility arrangements utilizing the enclosed inspection checklist.
• Vessel masters will be provided with the results of the inspection and those vessels deserving special recognition for excellence will be presented with plaques following the inspection. Vessels with boarding facilities determined to be below acceptable standards must correct the deficiencies prior to transit.

3. Export of Louisiana grain – to enhance how Panamax bulkers are utilised

• The US agribulk exporters may better utilise their chartered Panamaxes. Grain terminals in the lower Mississippi River, the port of New Orleans and the Southwest Pass have draughts of 13.7-14.3 m, whereas the pre-expansion locks only allow for a draught of 12.04 m, meaning that Panamaxes have been only partially loaded. The new locks will allow Panamaxes to be loaded to the maximum draughts at the US grain terminals.

4. Waiting time - Future experiences will tell us about any issues with the booking transit times for tramp tonnage.

• In the past there was long delays waiting for a transit slot and under voyage charter the waiting time will be to the account of the owner. Reefer ships with perishable or dangerous cargo, container ships and cruise ships plus many other ship types ran on well-established schedules.

 

Update, 26 May 2016:-

Mr Jorge L. Quijano, Administrator and CEO of Panama Canal Authority (ACP) gave a presentation on the New Panama Canal project in London on 6 May. Click here to download it.

 

Update, 25 Mar 2016:-

Panama Canal Authority (ACP) wrote to INTERCARGO, advising the inaugural transit and commercial opening of the new expanded Panama Canal to be held on 26 Jun 2016. We much appreciate ACP for their effort and congratulate them for the great achievement:

Panama INTERCARGO 

 

1. ACP Advisory to Shipping

On 21 Mar 2016, ACP issued Advisory to Shipping (No. A-12-2016), informing:
• Effective April 18, 2016, the max authorised transit draft will be set at 11.89m. For details of this Advisory, refer to ACP’s website at https://www.pancanal.com/common/maritime/advisories/2016/a-12-2016.pdf .
• Vessels loaded after this date shall comply with the new draft limitation.

2. New Panama Canal and impact on bulk carrier sector - a follow-up to the INTERCARGO meetings in Singapore on 7-8 Mar 2016.

 

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13 June 2016
Stowaways

Issue Summary

In 2007-2008, concern was expressed over the difficulties in landing stowaways because of delays, additional costs and inconvenience to the crew (and stowaway).  Noting that the actual numbers of stowaways reported to IMO appeared to be under-estimated, INTERCARGO and our Round Table partners convinced IMO to establish a “Stowaway Focal Point” (SFP) who would try and help the landing of stowaways when existing P&I expertise had been exhausted.  The provision of a SFP proved to be a short-term measure and subject to “trial” arrangements but INTERCARGO is happy to assist any member by asking for IMO support in circumstances where the member’s P&I Club is unable to make progress.

An IMO meeting starting on 6 September 2011 (FAL 37) will agree Stowaway Guidelines – inter alia, which may or may not include a cut off point of 14 days during which the ship owner / P&I Club may have to reimburse the initial receiving state for processing the stowaway.  The key issue is whether the Industry (owners Associations and P&I interests) should push for a defined time limit [14 days], running the risk that receiving states will be under no pressure to resolve the problem before then, as someone else will pay, or should we merely urge states to keep costs to a minimum?


INTERCARGO Policy

Although not a Bulk Carrier specific issue, INTERCARGO will continue to work with the International Group of P&I Clubs (IG) and their individual members to ensure that any specific stowaway incidents are resolved in a humanitarian way and as speedily as possible. INTERCARGO recognises the existing expertise of P&I Clubs in resolving stowaway problems.

“A speedier repatriation process; recognising the professional efforts of P&I Clubs and encouraging IMO to assist in the humanitarian resolution of practical seafaring problems”

Summary of Recent Developments

2009 – BIMCO created a Stowaways Clause for Time Charterparties.

9.10 : FAL (IMO Facilitation Committee) 36 : considered the IG paper FAL 36/6.  IMO noted under-reporting; that the average number of days a stowaway spent on board was 4.7 days with the longest at 174 days and that the total cost to IG Clubs net of deductibles was USD 14.3m.  The top five ports of embarkation were Lagos, Abidjan, Durban, Richards Bay and Tema.

6.9.11 : FAL 37 will review the IMO Guidelines “Allocation of responsibilities to seek the successful resolution of stowaway cases”.  The relevant IMO paper is FAL 37/6 – available to any member on request.

The Guidelines will incorporate subsequent SOLAS XI-2 and ISPS amendments and will be harmonised – as far as possible with the existing FAL Convention.  Note that some countries have not adopted the revised FAL Convention.

The draft Guidelines appear to be generally supportable as they are in line with international custom and practices.  Issues covered in the Guidelines include :-

- Definitions of:

a) a Stowaway (as per the revised FAL Convention) and

b) Attempted Stowaway (basically one found before the ship sails or leaves territorial waters);

- A general requirement for adequate searches of the ship prior to sailing and taking into consideration the possibility of stowaways before fumigation and sealing holds;

- Ports to work with owners, thus recognising that they have a responsibility in keeping attempted stowaways out of the port facility;

- Shipowners and Masters responsible for controlling access to the ship – broadly in line with ISPS requirements;

- Notes and a proforma report form dealing with questioning and the humane treatment of stowaways;

- Owners / P&I to cover to cover applicable costs relating to the removal, detention etc at the first port of landing. Should we invite IMO to consider the IMO’s Correspondence Group idea of putting a time limit on these costs ? If the stowaway is found in the embarkation port or in territorial waters, the state of the port of loading / embarkation is to consider no costs / charges / fines against the owners;

- State in the port of landing to consider mitigation of charges where the owner has cooperated and advised the state about the existence of stowaways;

 

Number of stowaways reported to IMO  (NB under-reporting)

Year

2007

2008

2009

Cases

252 (IG 842)

494

314

Stowaways

889 (IG 1,955)

2,052

1,071

Note : IG years counted from 20 Feb to 20 Feb each year



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18 September 2013